Expert reveals problem with Bermuda Triangle theory going viral

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The mystery behind the Bermuda Triangle might be solved — at least, that's what a Science Channel show claims.

The Bermuda Triangle is an area in the Atlantic Ocean between Bermuda, Florida and Puerto Rico that's famous for unexplained disappearances of ships and planes.

And according to two meteorologists who spoke to the Science Channel for an episode of "What on Earth?," the mystery of the waters could be connected to some oddly shaped clouds.

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Dr. Randy Cerveny and Dr. Steven Miller looked at satellite photos of the Bermuda Triangle and found hexagon-shaped clouds right above the area.

But in order to understand what the formations mean, the team had to look around the globe. They found similar cloud formations above the North Sea.

There, the hexagonal clouds bring winds up to 100 mph. Those winds have the ability to create ocean waves more than 30 feet high — easily high enough to sink a ship, according to the team.

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Don't look down: Scariest travel destinations
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Don't look down: Scariest travel destinations

Chamonix in the French Alps.

The Chamonix Skywalk is a five-sided glass structure installed on the top terrace of the Aiguille du Midi (3842m), with a 1,000 metre drop below, where visitors can step out from the terrace, giving the visitors the impression of standing in the void.

(REUTERS/Robert Pratta (FRANCE)

The Burj Kahlifa, the world's tallest building in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Situated in downtown Dubai, the building was completed in October 2009. The building stands 829.8 metres tall, 2,722 feet. Visitors to Dubai can visit the buidling, with an observation deck on the 124th floor, named 'At the Top'. The views from the deck are stunning and give an amazing view of the surrounds of Dubai. The lift taking visitors to the deck hurtles guests at top speed and then allows them space outside to view the surrounds. There are 24,348 windows in the building. The building dominates for miles around and is truly a spectacular building of our day.

Zhangjiajie, China

Picture shows the glass-bottomed bridge across the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon on June 12, 2016 in Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province of China. The bridge stretched 430 meters long, 6 meters wide and the biggest vertical drop was 1,430 meters under the path. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

Skywalk at the Grand Canyon on the Hualapai Indian Reservation at Grand Canyon West, Ariz.

(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Willis Tower, Chicago.

The observation deck of the 108-story Willis Tower (formerly named the Sears Tower), January 15, 2014. Over one million people visit its observation deck each year. The 1,451-foot building is home to United Airlines's main office.

(Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)

CN Tower, Toronto.

(AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Darren Calabrese)

Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia.

It's a curved pedestrian bridge built on top of Mt. Machinchang at a height of 700 meters above sea level. The bridge is suspended from a 82 meter pylon swinging out over the landscape to give visitors a unique view of the surrounding area and neighboring islands.

(Photo by John S Lander/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Blackpool, England.

 The observation deck at the top of the tower becomes the Blackpool Tower Eye and features a skywalk made of glass overlooking the sea and the promenade.

(Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Zhangjiajie, China.

Aerial view of tourists walking on the 100-meter-long and 1.6-meter-wide glass skywalk clung the cliff of Tianmen Mountain (or Tianmenshan Mountain) in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park on August 1, 2016 in Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province of China. The Coiling Dragon Cliff skywalk, featuring a total of 99 road turns, layers after another, is the third glass skywalk on the Tianmen Mountain (or Tianmenshan Mountain).

(Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

Auckland's Sky Tower, New Zealand.

Steeplejacks celebrate the completion of electrical and construction work on Auckland's Sky Tower.

Dachstein Mountains, Austria.

People on the 'Stairway to Nothingness' on the Dachstein Mountains.

Lion's Head, Cape Town, South Africa.

Lion's Head is known for spectacular views over both the city and the Atlantic Seaboard, and the hike to the top is particularly popular hike in the city and people hike up during full moon. Its slopes are also a popular launching point for paragliders.

(Photo by Nardus Engelbrecht/Gallo Images/Getty Images)

Via Ferrata, Telluride, Colorado. 

Traversing the Main Event section of the Via Ferrata. 

Capilano River, Vancouver.

The Capilano Suspension Bridge across the Capilano River in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, circa 1960.

(Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images)

Royal Gorge in Colorado Springs.
Devil's pool, Victoria Falls, Zambia.
Stone Stairway, Skellig Michael, Ireland.

El Caminito del Ray, Malaga Spain.

'El Caminito del Rey', which was built in 1905 and winds through the Gaitanes Gorge, reopened last weekend after a safer footpath was installed above the original. The path, known as the most dangerous footpath in the world, was closed after two fatal accidents in 1999 and 2000. The restoration started in 2011 and reportedly cost 5.5 million euros.

(Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)

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The pair theorizes that the clouds above the Triangle might be causing "air bombs," or microbursts, that could force powerful winds downward and cause massive waves.

But there are a couple of holes in their theory. First, this weather pattern doesn't just happen in this area. These kinds of cloud formations reportedly happen in a lot of mid- to high-latitude locations, typically in colder seasons.

Also, those clouds might not actually be causing "air bombs." An NBC meteorologist says those formations don't look like microbursts.

The pair were slightly surprised with the angle the Science Channel series took. Cerveny told USA Today, "They made it appear as if I was making a big breakthrough or something. Sadly, that's not the case."

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