Latest swing state polls before the final presidential debate

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The road to the White House requires grit, determination, moxie — and most importantly, 270 electoral college votes.

Here's a look at where Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton stand in crucial battleground states (where a combined 195 electoral college votes are up for grabs) just weeks before voters head to the polls.

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Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton take the stage for the second presidential debate
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Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton take the stage for the second presidential debate
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton acknowledge each other at the start of their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton stand together at the start of their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton appear together during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump listens as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during their presidential town hall debate with at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Saul Loeb/Pool
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during their presidential town hall debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Saul Loeb/Pool
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at the start of the second U.S. presidential town hall debate between Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens and takes notes during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump turns his back as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton talks about his comments about women during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
Moderators Anderson Cooper and Martha Raddatz speak before the start of the second U.S. presidential debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Melania Trump, Ivanka Trump, Eric Trump and Donald Trump Jr. stand before the presidential town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016.
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton acknowledge each other at the start of their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Saul Loeb/Pool
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the second U.S. presidential town hall debate between Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during the second U.S. presidential town hall debate between Clinton and Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens during their presidential town hall debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
The family of U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, (L-R) Melania, Ivanka, Eric and Donald Jr. wait for the presidential town hall debate with U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Marc Mezvinsky, Chelsea Clinton and Former U.S. President Bill Clinton sit at the presidential town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump listens as Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton answers a question from the audience during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during her debate against Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (L) at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during his presidential town hall debate against Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (not shown) at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump listens to Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks to Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Anderson Cooper, of CNN, and Martha Raddatz, of ABC News, moderate the second presidential debate between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. (Jim Bourg/Pool via AP)
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the presidential town hall debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her husband, former U.S. President Bill Clinton, board her campaign plane after the presidential town hall debate against U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Former U.S. President Bill Clinton watches as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump (L) and his wife, Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, participate in their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during their presidential town hall debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the presidential town hall debate with Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton pause at the conclusion of their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Saul Loeb/Pool
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Saul Loeb/Pool
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during the presidential town hall debate with Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump listens as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during their presidential town hall debate with at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
(L-R) Kathleen Willey, Juanita Broaddrick and Kathy Shelton sit together in the audience before Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton begin their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks as Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump's daughters-in-laws Lara Trump, Vanessa Trump and daughter Tiffany Trump (L-R) are seated at the start of the second U.S. presidential town hall debate between Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Chelsea Clinton and Former U.S. President Bill Clinton arrive at the presidential town hall debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton face the audience during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump looks at Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton during their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump is seen during his presidential town hall debate against Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (not shown) at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Journalists Anderson Cooper and Martha Raddatz prepare to moderate the presidential town hall debate between U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton makes her opening remarks at the start of the second U.S. presidential town hall debate between Clinton and Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton take the stage at the start of their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton shake hands at the end of their presidential town hall debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S., October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Arizona

Trump is leading in Arizona by just one percentage point, according to a RealClearPolitics average of statewide polls. However, the latest poll,conducted by Emerson College from Oct. 2-4, gives Clinton the advantage, 44% to 42%, in a four-way race including the top two third-party candidates. Arizona has 11 electoral college votes.

Colorado

Clinton has held a steady lead in Colorado in recent weeks. A RealClearPolitics average of state polls has her ahead of Trump by eight percentage points. The latest Quinnipiac poll, taken from Oct. 10-16, also shows her up by eight points in a four-way race. Colorado has nine electoral college votes.

Florida

Clinton is holding a narrow lead in the Sunshine State. A RealClearPolitics average of state polls puts her 3.6 percentage points ahead of Trump. And the latest Quinnipiac poll, taken Oct. 10-16, gives her a four-point lead in a four-way race against Trump and the third-party candidates. Florida has 29 electoral college votes.

RELATED: Will you be watching the final presidential debate?

Georgia

Trump took a big dip in the polls in Georgia over the summer. He bounced back last month and now leads Clinton by 5.5 percentage points, according to a RealClearPolitics average of state polls. The latest poll, conducted by Landmark Communications from Oct. 11-12, gives Trump a six-point advantage over Clinton in a three-way race including Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson. Georgia has 16 electoral college votes.

Iowa

Trump is leading in Iowa, but not by much. According to aRealClearPoliticsaverage of statewide polls, Trump beats Clinton by 3.7 percentage points. A Des Moines Register poll conducted from Oct. 3-6 puts Trump ahead by four points in a four-way race. Iowa has six electoral college votes.

Maine

In a four-way race including the top two third-party candidates, Clinton leads by 4.7 percentage points, according to a RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls. A Maine People's Resource Center poll conducted from Oct. 7-9 puts her ahead by eight points. Maine has two electoral college votes.

Michigan

Clinton has had a steady lead in Michigan for months. A RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls puts her ahead by 10.7 percentage points. The latest poll, conducted by Fox 2 Detroit/Mitchell last week, has Clinton up by 10 points. Michigan has 16 electoral college votes.

Minnesota

Clinton leads in Minnesota by 4.3 percentage points, according to a RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls. But the most recent poll, conducted by Gravis in late September puts Clinton and Trump tied in a four-way race. Minnesota has 10 electoral college votes.

Missouri

Trump has had a steady lead in Missouri since early September. A RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls puts Trump ahead by eight percentage points in a four-way race. The latest poll, conducted by Remington Research from Oct. 9-11, gives Trump a five-point lead. Missouri has 10 electoral college votes.

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Nevada

The race is close in Nevada, where Clinton leads by 2.5 percentage points in a four-way race, according to a RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls. The latest poll, conducted by CNN/ORC from Oct. 10-15, puts Clinton up by just two points. Nevada has six electoral college votes.

New Hampshire

Clinton has a small but steady lead in the Granite State. According to a RealClearPoliticsaverage of statewide polls, she is up by 3.6 percentage points. A recent WBUR/MassINC poll conducted from Oct. 10-12 put her ahead by three points in a four-way race. New Hampshire has four electoral college votes.

North Carolina

Trump has been gaining ground in North Carolina, where Clinton leads by 2.7 percentage points, according to a RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls. The latest CNN/ORC poll, conducted from Oct. 10-15, gives Clinton the edge by just one point. North Carolina has 15 electoral college votes.

Ohio

Ohio is a close race. A RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls has Trump up by 0.7 percentage points. The latest Quinnipiac poll, taken from Oct. 10-16, has Trump and Clinton tied in a four-way race including the top two third-party candidates. Ohio has 18 electoral college votes.

Pennsylvania

Clinton is gaining ground, while Trump is falling in the polls in Pennsylvania. A RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls puts Clinton ahead by 6.8 percentage points in a four-way race. A recent Quinnipiac poll taken from Oct. 10-16 has her ahead by six points. Pennsylvania has 20 electoral college votes.

Virginia

Clinton is ahead in Virginia by 8.7 percentage points, according to a RealClearPoliticsaverage of statewide polls. The latest poll, conducted by Christopher Newport University from Oct. 11-14, has Clinton up by 15 points. Virginia has 13 electoral college votes.

Wisconsin

Clinton is leading in Wisconsin by 6.7 percentage points, according to a RealClearPoliticsaverage of state polls. A Marquette poll conducted from Oct. 6-9 has Clinton up by seven points in a four-way race. Wisconsin has 10 electoral college votes.

Mic has ongoing presidential coverage. Please follow our main election hubas well as coverage of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

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