Donald Trump's campaign manager said she doesn't believe there will be voter fraud

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Donald Trump's campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, seemed to walk back on Wednesday the Republican presidential nominee's unfounded claim that there will be widespread voter fraud on election day.

Conway told MSNBC that she does see not evidence that states are rigging the election against Trump, though she asserted that there is a "larger conspiracy, larger collusion" between "some specific members of the media and the Clinton campaign."

Kellyanne Conway on the trail

18 PHOTOS
Donald Trump's Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway on the trail
See Gallery
Donald Trump's Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway on the trail
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway is pictured during a meeting with Trump's Hispanic Advisory Council at Trump Tower in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., August 20, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway (L) is pictured during a meeting with Trump's Hispanic Advisory Council at Trump Tower in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., August 20, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump stands near his campaign manager Kellyanne Conway (L) before being introduced for the Commander in Chief Forum in Manhattan, New York, U.S., September 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway (C) attends a campaign rally in Fort Myers, Florida, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Campaign manager Kellyanne Conway and Paul Manafort of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's staff speak during a round table discussion on security at Trump Tower in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., August 17, 2016. Picture taken August 17, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway (L) and Paul Manafort, staff of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, speak during a round table discussion on security at Trump Tower in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., August 17, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
UNITED STATES - JUNE 18: Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, talks with Kellyanne Conway at the Faith & Freedom Coalitions Road to Majority conference which featured speeches by conservative politicians at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, June 18, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 18: Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, greets Kellyanne Conway at the Faith & Freedom Coalitions Road to Majority conference which featured speeches by conservative politicians at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, June 18, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 18: Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., talks with Kellyanne Conway at the Faith & Freedom Coalitions Road to Majority conference which featured speeches by conservative politicians at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, June 18, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Matt Bai. National Politics Correspondent, Yahoo! News, Kellyanne Conway, Republican Strategist and Pollster, and moderator Chuck Todd appear on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday May 8, 2016. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
Kellyanne Conway, president and chief executive officer of Polling Co. Inc./Woman Trend, smiles during an interview on 'With All Due Respect' in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, July 5, 2016. Asked how Trump reassures conservatives about his positions on issues such as abortion without losing ground with voters in the center, Republican pollster Conway, one of Trump's new senior strategists, said he would work to shift the spotlight to Clinton. Photographer: Chris Goodney/Bloomberg via Getty Images
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Kellyanne Conway, Republican Strategist & Pollster, left, and Robert Costa, National Political Reporter, The Washington Post, right, appear on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday May 29, 2016. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - Kellyanne Conway is a guest on 'Good Morning America,' 5/10/16, airing on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Lou Rocco/ABC via Getty Images) KELLYANNE CONWAY, GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS
ASTON, PA - SEPTEMBER 22: Campaign manager Kellyanne Conway (R) stands backstage as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at the Sun Center Studios September 22, 2016 in Aston, Pennsylvania. A national poll released yesterday shows Trump trailing Democratic rival Hillary Clinton by 6 points in a four-way matchup. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - Kellyanne Conway discusses the Trump Campaign on 'Good Morning America,' 9/7/16, airing on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS, KELLYANNE CONWAY
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, talks with his campaign manager Kellyanne Conway during a visit to Goody's Restaurant, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016, in Brook Park, Ohio. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Kellyanne Conway, new campaign manager for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, speaks to reporters in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

"Absent overwhelming evidence that there is, it would not be for me to say that there is," Conway said.

She added: "Donald Trump is reading reports about rigged system - voter irregularities."

But when pressed about specific instances of voter fraud, Conway appeared to suggest that the "rigged" system was not meant to be taken literally, and was simply a rhetorical catch-all for what the campaign views as injustices in the American political system.

"I think everyone is missing his larger point," Conway said.

"It is a rigged corrupt system, whether you believe it's rigged and corrupt at the polls, or whether we have a $19 trillion debt and people who are there for years and years, if not decades," she added.

Exercise your right -- get out and vote:

Over the past week, Trump and many of his top campaign surrogates have increasingly made the unfounded case that there is a widespread conspiracy to "rig" the election against Trump.

"Of course there is large scale voter fraud happening on and before election day," Trump tweeted Monday morning. "Why do Republican leaders deny what is going on? So naive!"

Former GOP Congressmen who oppose Trump

31 PHOTOS
30 former GOP congressmen come out against Trump
See Gallery
30 former GOP congressmen come out against Trump

Bob Bauman (R-MD)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Steve Bartlett (R-TX)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY)

(Photo by Chris Kleponis/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Jack Buechner (R-MO)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Tom Campbell (R-CA)

(Photo by Douglas Graham/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

Bill Clinger (R-PA)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Tom Coleman (R-MO)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Geoff Davis (R-KY)

(Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call via Getty Images)

Mickey Edwards (R-OK)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Harris Fawell (R-IL)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Ed Foreman (R-TX) (R-NM)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Amo Houghton, Jr. (R-NY)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Gordon Humphrey (Senator, R-NH)

(AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Bob Inglis (R-SC)

(AP Photo/ Richard Shiro)

Jim Kolbe (R-AZ)

(AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Steve Kuykendall (R-CA)

(AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

Jim Leach (R-IA) 

(Photo by Matthew Staver/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Pete McCloskey (R-CA)

(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Connie Morella (R-MD)

(Photo by Susan Biddle/The Washington Post/Getty Images)

Mike Parker (R-MS)

(AP Photo/Rogelio Solis)

Tom Petri (R-WI)

(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

John Porter (R-IL)

(Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

Claudine Schneider (R-RI)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

John "Joe" Schwarz (R-MI)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Chris Shays (R-CT)

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Peter Smith (R-VT)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Edward Weber (R-OH)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Vin Weber (R-MN)

(Photo by Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

G. William Whitehurst (R-VA)

(Photo via US Government/Wikipedia)

Dick Zimmer (R-NJ) 

(AP Photo/Mel Evans)

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

A number of prominent Republicans in charge of overseeing the election at the state level have criticized Trump's inflammatory claim.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted, a Republican supporting Trump, called the US election system "one of the bedrocks of American democracy," and added that "we should not question it or the legitimacy of it."

"It works very well in places like Ohio," he said. "We make it easy to vote and hard to cheat. We have a bipartisan system of elections. Frankly, it's the only place you can find Republicans and Democrats working cooperatively together. They work that way in our election system to make sure the integrity of our election system is upheld and that people feel good about the process of voting."

More from Business Insider:

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners