October heat wave could shatter over 50 records across US

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By Linda Lam and Jon Erdman for Weather.com

Record-breaking warmth has gripped parts of the Plains the last couple of days, and this heat will continue to spread to the East Coast through midweek.

For some locations, October will feel more like late summer thanks to this taste of "Indian Summer." Changes are on the way, however, as a return to more typical fall temperatures sweeps across most of the central and eastern United States by late week.

Record-Breaking October Heat

This dose of Indian Summer is thanks to an area of high pressure off the Eastern Seaboard coupled with a migration of the jet stream to the Upper Midwest and eastern Canada.

Dodge City, Kansas, set a new record high for the entire month of October on Monday, topping out at 101 degrees. Records date back to the late 1800s in the southwestern Kansas city. This broke the previous October record high of 99 degrees, set just the day before on Sunday.

A 100-degree high temperature was recorded in McAllen, Texas, on Monday. This was the latest 100-degree day on record there, surpassing the previous date of Oct. 15, 1957.

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The first day of autumn around the world
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 22: A band of cloud stretches across the sky as the sun sets behind St Pauls Cathedral and cranes on the skyline on September 22, 2016 in London, England. The sun sets on the autumnal equinox which marks the first official day of autumn in the United Kingdom. (Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 22: Stag rut at Richmond Park on September 22, 2016 in London, England. Today marks the first day of autumn, also known as the autumn equinox, where night and day are equal. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 22: A heron in Richmond Park on September 22, 2016 in London, England. Today marks the first day of autumn, also known as the autumn equinox, where night and day are equal. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
Windmills are seen through the morning mist rising from a field in Sehnde near Hanover, northern Germany, on September 22, 2016. Autumn officially begins on the equinox on September 22. / AFP / dpa / Julian Stratenschulte / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read JULIAN STRATENSCHULTE/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 22: A man goes for a run in Richmond Park on September 22, 2016 in London, England. Today marks the first day of autumn, also known as the autumn equinox, where night and day are equal. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
Morning mist hangs over the river Elbe in Dresden, eastern Germany, on September 22, 2016. Autumn officially begins on the equinox on September 22. / AFP / dpa / Arno Burgi / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read ARNO BURGI/AFP/Getty Images)
The sun sets behind the rocks of Sete Nave on a sunny autumn evening outside Pietrosella, on the southern part of Corsica, France, September 22, 2016. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
ADANA, TURKEY - SEPTEMBER 22 : Lightnings strike over at night in Adana, Turkey on September 22, 2016. (Photo by Ibrahim Erikan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Morning mist hangs over the historic old town in Dresden, eastern Germany, on September 22, 2016. Autumn officially begins on the equinox on September 22. / AFP / dpa / Arno Burgi / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read ARNO BURGI/AFP/Getty Images)
Great Slave Lake and Jolliffe Island are seen from the Pilot Monument in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, in this picture taken September 22, 2015. Each winter, in the far reaches of Canada's north, a highway of ice built atop frozen lakes and tundra acts as a supply lifeline to remote diamond mines, bustling with traffic for a couple of months before melting away in the spring. Due to unseasonably warm weather, this year the world's busiest ice road is running late. Picture taken on September 22, 2015. REUTERS/Susan Taylor
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A few daily record highs that were set on Monday include:

St. Louis topped out at 91 degrees, breaking the previous record high of 88 degrees.
Nashville, Tennessee, reached 86 degrees tying the record high from 2007 and 1965.
Tulsa, Oklahoma reached 90 degrees, which tied the record high from 2005, 1947 and 1921.
La Guardia Airport in New York City set a new record high by reaching 83 degrees. The old record was 80 degrees.

Amarillo, Texas, topped out at 98 degrees on Sunday, making it the warmest day so late in the season there. It was also just one degree shy of tying their all-time October record high.

At least one location in Texas reached the triple digits on Sunday. The panhandle town of Perryton near the Oklahoma border was 102 degrees.

Slapout, Oklahoma, also hit 102 degrees on Sunday, making it the hottest temperature so late in the season for the entire state, according to the Oklahoma Climate Survey.

Several daily records were set in the Plains on Saturday, as well.

Record warm low temperatures were also set in ten states on Monday. Many of these records were broken by several degrees including:

Madison, Wisconsin only dropped to 65 degrees, previous record was 61 degrees.
Dubuque, Iowa only dipped to 69 degrees, previous record was 61 degrees.
Chicago, Illinois saw a low of 67 degrees, previous record was 63 degrees.
Kansas City, Missouri only dropped to 71 degrees, previous record was 67 degrees.
St. Louis, Missouri reached a low of 72 degrees, previous record was 66 degrees.
Paducah, Kentucky only dipped to 76 degrees, previous record was 64 degrees.
Wichita, Kansas only dropped to 70 degrees, previous record was 68 degrees.
Dallas, Texas recorded a low of 73 degrees, previous record was 72 degrees.

There were also records set for highest dew point so late in the year on Monday. Rochester, Minnesota reached a dew point of 68 degrees breaking the previous record of 68 degrees on October 13, 1962. La Crosse, Wisconsin tied the highest dew point recorded in October with a dew point of 70 degrees. This was also the highest dew point so late in the year, previous record was 70 degrees on October 15, 1962.

Dozens of Additional Record Highs Likely

Highs in the 70s and 80s will be plentiful in parts of the Midwest, South and East. Yes, even a few 90s are expected in the South. Dozens of daily record highs will likely fall by the wayside, and some more locations may set their record warmest temperatures so late in the year.

And some morning "low" temperatures will feel more like average mid-October highs in some areas. Several cities may continue to set record warm low temperatures as well.

Let's break down the day-by-day highlights:

(MAPS: 10-Day National High/Low Forecast)

Tuesday Outlook

70s will surge into parts of interior northern New England and southern New England
80s will persist in the Northeast at least as far north as the Syracuse-Albany corridor.
Some 90s will bake parts of the Deep South
Daily record highs could be numerous from the Northeast to the Ohio Valley and the Deep South
Potential record high cities (current daily record shown): Atlanta (86 degrees) | Louisville, Kentucky (86 degrees) | New York City (82 degrees) | Philadelphia (85 degrees) | Washington D.C. (85 degrees)

Wednesday Outlook

70s expected in eastern New England
80s will persist in the Northeast at least as far north as New York City.
A few low 90s will bake parts of the Deep South
Daily record highs are possible from the Northeast to the Deep South.
Potential record high cities (current daily record shown): Charlotte, North Carolina (87 degrees) | Montgomery, Alabama (88 degrees) | Newark, New Jersey (82 degrees) | Philadelphia (80 degrees)

A Return to Fall Weather

By late this week, a cold front will have swept away the record warmth, sending temperatures back to levels more typical of fall.

Cooler air will first sweep into the High Plains of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas on Tuesday. Dodge City, Kansas, may only be in the low 70s Tuesday and Wednesday, just days after seeing all-time October record warmth.

Temperatures will gradually trend back to near average for this time of year across the nation's entire midsection Wednesday into Thursday. Along the East Coast, highs will be closer to average Friday into the weekend.

By Friday, highs will be in the 50s and 60s in the Plains and Midwest, with 60s and 70s in portions of the South. Dew points will also drop, allowing the crisp fall air to return.

Low temperatures will also drop with temperatures up to 10 degrees below average in the central U.S. to end the week. Lows will tumble back into the 30s for much of the Midwest and northern Plains Friday and Saturday mornings.

(MAPS: Fall Foliage)

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