New dwarf planet discovered hanging out in the far reaches of our solar system

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A dwarf new planet was discover in our solar system.

The planet called, 2014 UZ224, is a celestial orb that measures only 330 miles across. According to Scientific American, it's size makes it less than half the size of Pluto's moon Charon.

The celestial orb orbits the sun at a distance of roughly 8.5 billion miles. It is so far away that it makes a full circle every 1,100 years or so.

The locating of the dwarf planet was in a rather non-traditional way. It involved a device called a Dark Energy Camera. According to NPR, this is typically used for tracking stellar explosions and mapping other galaxies.

The discovery was also aided by a group of University of Michigan undergraduates. The students were participating in a summer project led by Professor David Gerdes.

Gerdes is now using the type of information learn in this locating to find the hypothesized Planet Nine.


What it's been like to work atNASA over the years:

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What it's been like to work at NASA over the years
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What it's been like to work at NASA over the years

A researcher checks on Sam, a Rhesus monkey who rode on a Little Joe spacecraft and experienced three minutes of weightlessness in 1959. Test animals were often used during Project Mercury.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

In 1961, Dean Sheibley and Barbara Johnson perform studies in NASA's now-defunct Plum Brook Reactor Facility's chemistry lab — the organization's first and last nuclear reactor.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Former US president Harry S. Truman stopped by NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C. on November 3, 1961. Former NASA administrator James E. Webb gave him a tour and a collection of rocket models for his presidential library.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Dr. Nancy Roman looks over a model of an observatory in 1962. She had joined NASA two years previously and served as the chief of astronomy and relativity programs in the office of cosmic background explorer.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

On March 23, 1963, NASA employee Orville Driver demonstrates the size of a water line used in a NASA construction project.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

In a dry lake bed in the Mojave Desert near the Dryden Flight Research Center, pilots speak over the M2-F1 lifting body aircraft on November 12, 1963. Sometime later, the vehicle was damaged during a drill due to an issue with the landing gear.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

NASA's Gemini 6 prime crew go through suiting up exercises on October 20, 1965.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Flight controllers monitor the Apollo 4 space mission in NASA's mission operations control room on November 9, 1967.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Marjorie Townsend and a colleague discuss the X-ray Explorer Satellite during preflight tests at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center on December 2, 1970. Townsend was the first woman to receive an engineering degree from George Washington University and joined NASA in 1959.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Skylab 3 crew members Alan L. Bean (foreground), Owen K. Garriott (left), and Jack R. Lousma pose for a picture on February 2, 1972. They spent 59 days and 11 hours in orbit.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Edward G. Gibson (seated) and William R. Pogue discuss a mission procedure at the Johnson Space Center on September 10, 1973.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

The first all-female crew of scientific experimenters works on an exercise on December 16, 1974.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Despite the zero gravity atmosphere, astronaut Joe Engle manages to shave on November 16, 1981.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

President Ronald Reagan addresses NASA employees and cuts the cake celebrating the organization's 25th birthday on October 19, 1983.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Astronaut Dale A. Gardner jokes around on a satellite retrieval mission on November 14, 1984.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

NASA scientists load a model into a test section on November 20, 1985.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Astronaut Mae Jemison works in the Spacelab-J module on October 22, 1992.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Astronaut N. Jan Davis works on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) on the aft flight deck of the Space Shuttle Discovery. This photo was taken on August 19, 1997 during a 12-day mission in Earth-orbit.

(Photo via NASA on The Commons/Flickr)

Dr. Marshall Shepherd gives a lecture on NASA's hurricane research on September 8, 2004.

(Photo via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

A technician works on the James Webb Space Telescope on November 9, 2005 at the NASA Goddard Flight Center.

(Photo via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

Betsy Pugel tests materials for thermal protection systems on April 20, 2007.

(Photo via PRONASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

Engineer Dave Folta tests out the Goddard CAVE, NASA's visualization facility that simulates an orbital environment on April 6, 2009.

(Photo via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

Engineer Erin Wilson tapes up the electrical cables of special optical equipment on May 10, 2012.

(Photo via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

NASA scientists celebrate as the first images of Mars come in from the Curiosity rover on August 5, 2012.

(Photo via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

Steven Christe works on the Solar Aspect System for the HEROES mission in August 28, 2013.

(Photo via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

NASA scientists inspect the sun shield on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope on June 18, 2015.

(Photo via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

Actor Leonardo DiCaprio visits NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to interview NASA scientists on April 23, 2016.

(Photo via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr)

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