This hairy crab is named after the world's favorite monster

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A rare crab species gets its name from everybody's favorite monster -- the Yeti.

And that's because it's hairy. Very, very hairy.

SEE ALSO: Divers come face-to-face with massive Sunfish

The yeti crab was discovered in 2005 near Easter Island. Since then, three different types of yeti crabs have been discovered.

Scientists found that yeti crabs are blind because they actually don't have eyes.

Thankfully the blond bristles on their legs helps them live. They eat the bacteria that gets caught in it.

Yeti crabs are around 15 centimeters long and found in the dark depths of the ocean. They find a sweet spot between freezing to death in the cold water by living near hydrothermal vents.

So the chances of you seeing this yeti crab are as slim as seeing the infamous Yeti creature itself.

RELATED: See what other creatures live deep in the depths of the ocean

8 PHOTOS
Deep-sea creatures found in Hawaii
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Deep-sea creatures found in Hawaii
In this Sept. 2016 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a glass squid that was found off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island is shown. Federal researchers just returned from an expedition to study the biodiversity and mechanisms of an unusually rich deep-sea ecosystem off the coast of Hawaii. (NOAA via AP)
In this Sept. 2016 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a dragonfish that was found off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island is shown. Federal researchers just returned from an expedition to study the biodiversity and mechanisms of an unusually rich deep-sea ecosystem off the coast of Hawaii. (NOAA via AP)
In this Sept., 2016 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, swallower fish that were found off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island are shown. Federal researchers just returned from an expedition to study the biodiversity and mechanisms of an unusually rich deep-sea ecosystem off the coast of Hawaii. (NOAA via AP)
In this Sept. 2016 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a spookfish that was found off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island is shown. Federal researchers just returned from an expedition to study the biodiversity and mechanisms of an unusually rich deep-sea ecosystem off the coast of Hawaii. (Jessica Chen/NOAA via AP)
In this Sept., 2016 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a Commerson's frogfish that was found off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island is shown. Federal researchers just returned from an expedition to study the biodiversity and mechanisms of an unusually rich deep-sea ecosystem off the coast of Hawaii. (NOAA via AP)
Robotic arms on the Pisces V submersible open a bag of bait on the Cook seamount during a manned dive to the previously unexplored underwater volcano off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island on Sept. 6, 2016. The Cook seamount is a 13,000-foot extinct volcano at the bottom of the sea whose summit is 3,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
Deep sea coral and sponges sit on the summit of the Cook seamount, seen from the Pisces V submersible during a dive to the previously unexplored underwater volcano off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island on Sept. 6, 2016. The Cook is a 13,000-foot extinct volcano at the bottom of the sea whose summit is 3,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
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