WHO sending 1 million cholera vaccine doses to Haiti

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GENEVA, Oct 11 (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Tuesday that it was sending 1 million doses of cholera vaccine to Haiti, where cases of the killer disease have climbed in the wake of Hurricane Matthew.

"The top priority for those people affected by the hurricane is to give them access to clean water. That is the only way we can control cholera," Dominique Legros, WHO cholera expert, told a news briefing before traveling to the Caribbean country.

20 PHOTOS
Cholera outbreak in Haiti post Hurricane Matthew
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Cholera outbreak in Haiti post Hurricane Matthew
A child is being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins 
Men receive treatment for cholera after Hurricane Matthew in the Hospital of Port-a-Piment, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A child is being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Children are treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A woman is being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Two women take care of two children receiving treatment for cholera after Hurricane Matthew in the Hospital of Port-a-Piment, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares 
A boy receives a drip to be treated for cholera after Hurricane Matthew in the Hospital of Port-a-Piment, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
A man is treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People are treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A child is being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People are being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People are treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People are being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A child is being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
People are being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A child is being treated at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
A woman feeds her child at the cholera treatment center at the hospital after Hurricane Matthew passes in Jeremie, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Adults hold children receiving treatment for cholera after Hurricane Matthew in the Hospital of Port-a-Piment, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
Relatives and patients treated for cholera after Hurricane Matthew in the Hospital of Port-a-Piment, Haiti, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
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Some 150 suspected cholera cases have been reported in Grande'Anse department and 50 in South department, he said. "It is more than usual, I know it is a sharp increase compared to usual figures."

WHO was considering giving people a single dose of the vaccine rather than the classic double dose, to cover more people, albeit it with a shorter protection period, Legros said.

(Reporting by Stephanie Nebehay; Editing by Mark Trevelyan)

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