Astounding video shows bumblebee pulling a string to get a treat

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Bumblebees are social insects that can work together to solve more complex problems, finds a recently published study.

A news release states that an international team of researchers found that "...bumblebees can figure out how to pull a string to get a sugar water reward."

Additionally, they determined "...that watching this [behavior] helps other bees learn to do it too, and that this new skill continues to spread through a colony even after the original string-puller is gone."

For the experiment, the team trained bees to pull a string in order to access a small amount of sugar water on the surface of a covered disk.

They then had 25 untrained bees observe the action and found that 60 percent of this group eventually learned how to perform the task as a result.

The study also points out that the skill was quickly passed on among members and that new string pullers often became teachers to others in the colony.

Based on the results, researchers suggest that even relatively simple animals have the basic tools needed "for the cultural spread of unusual skills."

RELATED: Learn more about the dangers affecting the bee population:

15 PHOTOS
NTP: Pesticide-makers point to other culprits in bee die-offs
See Gallery
NTP: Pesticide-makers point to other culprits in bee die-offs
Sarah Myers, right, a manager at the Bayer North American Bee Care Center, shows a tray of bees to St. Thomas More Academy student Maria Pompi, left, during a tour of the center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
A carpenter bee buzzes around the garden at the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
St. Thomas More Academy students Maria Pompi, left, and Megan Boretti, right, sample honey sticks during a tour of the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
Chava Kirkpatrick stares at a drawing of a bee on the floor of the Bayer North American Bee Care Center during a student tour of the center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
Bees swarm around honeycomb at the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
Chava Kirkpatrick listens to an educational video about bees during a tour of the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
A carpenter bee pollinates a flower in the garden at the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
Sarah Myers, background, a manager at the Bayer North American Bee Care Center, prepares to show a tray of bees to St. Thomas More Academy students during the students' tour of the center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
St. Thomas More Academy student Maggie McGrath, right, is reflected in a window between her and a tray of bees held by Sarah Myers, a manager at the Bayer North American Bee Care Center, during a student tour of the center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
St. Thomas More Academy student Jonny Huetter wears two miniature bees during a tour of the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
St. Thomas More Academy student Cara Garrison takes notes during a tour of the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
St. Thomas More Academy student Maria Pompi samples a honey stick during a tour of the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
Insecticides advertised as bee-friendly on display at the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
Students from St. Thomas More Academy gather in front of the Bayer North American Bee Care Center in Research Triangle Park, N.C., Tuesday, Sep. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)
HIDE CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners