WATCH LIVE: Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in first 2016 presidential debate

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will go head-to-head in the first 2016 presidential debate in New York on Monday night.

The debate is scheduled to start at 9 p.m. at Hofstra University in New York and will be broadcast on all major networks and streamed across the internet.

RELATED: You'll never guess the most-watched presidential debate in history

Experts are predicting that the debate could turn out to draw the largest audience of all time, with an audience that might rival Super Bowl numbers.

15 notable presidential debate moments in history:

15 notable presidential debate moments in history
See Gallery
15 notable presidential debate moments in history
(Original Caption) San Francisco: Jimmy Carter (L) takes notes as Pres. Ford makes a point during the second of the presidential debates at the Palace of Fine Arts here.
Vice President Richard Nixon dabs at his chin and lip in Los Angeles on Oct. 13, 1960, during his televised debate with Sen. John F. Kennedy. Nixon was in a studio in Los Angeles, while Kennedy was in a studio in New York. This was the third in a series of debates between the two presidential candidates. (AP Photo)
Rick Perry stumbles when trying to name the three Federal Departments he would eliminate as president during the CNBC Michigan GOP Presidential Debate in Rochester, Michigan. (Photo by Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Corbis via Getty Images)
ST. LOUIS - OCTOBER 02: Democratic vice presidential candidate U.S. Senator Joe Biden (D-DE) and Republican vice presidential candidate Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (L) greet each other at the start of the vice presidential debate at the Field House of Washington University's Athletic Complex on October 2, 2008 in St. Louis, Missouri. The highly anticipated showdown between the two vice-presidential candidates will be their only debate before the election. (Photo by Don Emmert-Pool/Getty Images)
Presidential candidate Ross Perot speaks during the 1992 Presidential Debates. (Photo by © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, United States: US Vice-President Dick Cheney points during his face off with Democratic vice-presidential candidate John Edwards at Case Western Reserve University 05 October, 2004 in Cleveland, Ohio. The vice-presidential debate is focusing on foreign and domestic policies. AFP PHOTO/Steve JAFFE (Photo credit should read STEVE JAFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
YEAR-2008 US Republican presidential candidate John McCain (R) and Democrat Barack Obama leave the table after the final presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, on October 15, 2008. AFP PHOTO/Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)
New York Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) stands on stage with rival Illinois Senator Barack Obama (C) and Republican presidential contender Arizona Senator John McCain (R) at the end of the ABC/Facebook New Hampshire debates in Manchester, 05 January 2008. AFP PHOTO/Emmanuel DUNAND (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Omaha, Nebraska: Following their vice presidential debate, Senators Lloyd Bentsen (L) of Texas and Dan Quayle (R) of Indiana reach out to shake hands, October 5th.
NASHVILLE, TN - OCTOBER 07: Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) (R) speaks during the debate with Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) (L) at the Town Hall Presidential Debate at Belmont University's Curb Event Center October 7, 2008 in Nashville, Tennessee. Tonight's debate is the second presidential debate of three, the only one being held in the town hall style with questions coming from audience members. (Photo by Anthony Jacobs/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis wipes his upper lip during the first presidential debate with his opponent U.S. Vice President George Bush in Winston-Salem, N.C., Sunday night, Sept. 25, 1988. (AP Photo/Bob Jordan)
CLEVELAND, United States: Gwen Ifill (C), moderator of the vice-presidential debate, faces US Vice-President Dick Cheney (L) and Democratic vice-presidential candidate John Edwards 05 October, 2004 during the candidates only face-to-face debate in the 2004 White House race at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.The vice-presidential debate is focusing on foreign and domestic policies. AFP PHOTO/Jeff HAYNES (Photo credit should read JEFF HAYNES/AFP/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 13: Vice presidential candidate James Stockdale, an independent candidate, speaks during the debate at Georgia Tech 13 October, 1992 in Atlanta, GA. Stockdale debated Vice President Dan Quayle and Senator Al Gore. (Photo credit should read J. DAVID AKE/AFP/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Kansas City: Combo of President Reagan and his Democratic opponent, Walter Mondale in their final Presidential debate of the 1984 campaign in Kansas City.
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2000: Texas Gov. George W. Bush answers a question as Vice President Al Gore looks on during the third and final presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis. (Photo by Harry Hamburg/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)

All those expected viewers could mean the debate has a significant impact on national polls. Clinton held a small lead over Trump in polling going into Monday morning, but saw her chances of winning pull even with Trump for the first time since before the Democratic National Convention.

Clinton saw a boost coming out of the late July convention that lasted for some weeks, with her lead increasing into double digits at one point.

RELATED: The most memorable moments in debate history

The debate will be hosted by Lester Holt of NBC's Nightly News. While all eyes will be on the candidates, there has also been rampant speculation over the role Holt will choose the play. Political pundits and media experts have spent the last few days ruminating on whether or not he will -- or even should -- fact check either of the candidates heavily during the debate.

Experts and insiders will be anticipating how the candidates approach the debates. Trump performed well and was generally seen as the winner of most of the primary debates, but he has not been seen in a one-on-one debating environment and many wonder if the change of dynamics will impact his demeanor. Clinton's behavior will also be closely watched, with many wondering how aggressively she will challenge Trump during the debate.

Read Full Story

People are Reading