These five facts will make you fall even more in love with Sea Otters

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Sea Otters are one of the cutest animals on the planet.

Here are some of facts that will make you fall in love with them all over again.

SEE ALSO: These tiny bats look just like cotton balls

1. They are the ultimate definition of relationship goals. Sea Otters hold hands so they don't drift apart while they sleep, but if there is no friend on hand, they use kelp as a blanket to anchor themselves.

2. They have the world's thickest fur. Sea Otters have the thickest fur out of all mammals with about 1 million hairs per square inch. This comes in handy because they are the only marine animal to not have a layer of blubber

3. They are impressive. Sea Otters can swim up to six miles per hour and hold their breaths for up to four minutes. They use these skills to dive as deep as 330 feet beneath the surface.

4. They are the biggest weasel ever. Sea Otters are the largest member of the weasel family, weighing up to 100 lbs.

5. They are a part of the Harry Potter world. J.K. Rowling's favorite animal is an otter. She even made Hermione's patronus an otter.

While these facts only prove how amazing they are, these cuddly creatures are endangered.

They were nearly hunted to extinction back in the 1700s and 1800s, and while the population has recovered, the number one threat to sea otters today are oil spills caused by humans.

Help save our furry friends -- they are obviously too cute and cool to miss out on.

RELATED: See more adorable sea otters photos below

15 PHOTOS
Adorable sea otters
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Adorable sea otters
FILE - In this May 8, 2007 file photo, an otter cleans itself in the water in Monterey, Calif. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it wants to stop relocating southern sea otters from the mainland California coast to one of the Channel Islands because the 24-year-old effort isn't helping the threatened species. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, file)
An Alaskan sea otter swims holding a heart-shaped block of ice, presented by his keeper in the aquarium of an amusement park in Yokohama on February 11, 2015. The event takes place once a day for park visitors until February 15 in celebration of Valentine's Day on February 14. AFP PHOTO / KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo credit should read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
An Alaskan sea otter swims holding a heart-shaped block of ice, presented by his keeper in the aquarium of an amusement park in Yokohama on February 11, 2015. The event takes place once a day for park visitors until February 15 in celebration of Valentine's Day on February 14. AFP PHOTO / KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo credit should read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
Aniak, right, a sea otter at the Seattle Aquarium, swims with her yet-to-be named daughter, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012, in Seattle. The baby was born on Jan. 14, 2012 and will be named in February, after the public votes on a selection of names prepared by the Aquarium staff. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
FILE - A sea otter floats in Kachemak Bay, Alaska, in this July 1, 2003 file photo. Alaska state senator Bert Stedman, R-Sitka, is proposing a bounty on sea otters, the cuddly little marine mammals often seen by tourists swimming on their backs between cruise ships, sometimes munching on a freshly caught King crab. Stedman doesnât see the otters as cute critters; he considers them as a threat to fishing beds and the crab harvest in Alaska. The Sitka Republican has introduced a bill in February 2013 that would have the state pay Alaska Natives, who are the only residents legally allowed to kill sea otters, $100 for every dead otter they bring in. (AP Photo/Laura Rauch, File)
Aniak, left, a sea otter at the Seattle Aquarium, swims with her yet-to-be named daughter on her chest, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012, in Seattle, as Aniak's mother, Lootas, swims by at right. The baby was born on Jan. 14, 2012 and will be named in February, after the public votes on a selection of names prepared by the Aquarium staff. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
VANCOUVER, CANADA - FEBRUARY 18: A sea otter relaxes in his Vancouver aquarium tank February 18, 2009 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Vancouver is the host city for the 2010 Winter Olympic Games being held February 12-28, 2010. (Photo by Robert Giroux/Getty Images)
Sea Otter frolicking in the kelp bed, in the no otter zone south of Point Conception, off the Santa Barbara County coast. The no otter zone was created in 1982 to protect the shellfish industry and goes from south of Point Conception to the Mexican border. A new Sea Otter recovery plan, which will soon be issued, may and the no otter zone for the benefit of the species. (Photo by Ricardo Dearatanha/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Canadian sea otters swim on June 5, 2012 in the zoo of Amneville, eastern France. AFP PHOTO / JEAN-CHRISTOPHE VERHAEGEN (Photo credit should read JEAN-CHRISTOPHE VERHAEGEN/AFP/GettyImages)
Fifteen year-old Alaskan sea otter 'Yutan' swims as he holds a heart-shaped piece of ice treat given to him by his keeper at the aquarium at the Hakkeijima Sea Paradise amusement park in Yokohama, a suburb of Tokyo, on February 6, 2016. AFP PHOTO / Toru YAMANAKA / AFP / TORU YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)
Alaskan sea otter 'Yutan' swims as he holds a heart-shaped pice of ice given to him by his keeper at the aquarium at the Hakkeijima Sea Paradise amusement park in Yokohama, suburban Tokyo, on February 11, 2013. Visitors can attend the event once a day in the afternoon until February 17 amid celebrations for St. Valentine's Day. AFP PHOTO/Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)
Tokyo, JAPAN: A five-year-old female Russian sea otter Meel (L) holds her baby on her chest and swims in the large fish tank during a press preview at the Sunshine International Aquarium in Tokyo 13 June 2007. The aquarium unveiled the baby Russian sea ottar, born at the aquarium 02 June. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
A sea otter looks out from behind a rock in its exhibit at the New York Aquarium at Coney Island, in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2006. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)
FILE - This May 8, 2007 file photo shows an otter cleaning itself in the water in Monterey, Calif. California's Department of Fish and Game says there was a record number of shark-bitten sea otters last month along the state's Central Coast. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
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