Betty Shelby, Oklahoma officer charged in Terence Crutcher's death, released on bond

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon


The Oklahoma officer at the center of a firestorm over the use of police force, Betty Shelby, turned herself in to authorities for manslaughter charges Friday morning in Tulsa, and was released on $50,000 bond.

Shelby is accused of killing of an unarmed black man, Terence Crutcher, after his SUV broke down last week.

SEE ALSO: Charlotte protests diminish early on Friday as family views video

Prosecutors allege that "fear resulted in her unreasonable actions which led her to shooting." They said Friday in a statement that Shelby "unlawfully and unnecessarily" shot Crutcher.

The affidavit alleges Shelby "reacted unreasonably by escalating the situation from a confrontation with Mr. Crutcher, who was not responding to verbal commands and was walking away from her with his hands held up, becoming emotionally involved to the point that she overreacted."

More on this story

14 PHOTOS
Cop shoots unarmed man in Tulsa
See Gallery
Cop shoots unarmed man in Tulsa
This undated photo provided by the Tulsa Oklahoma Police Department shows officer Betty Shelby. Police say Tulsa officer Shelby fired the fatal shot that killed 40 year-old Terence Crutcher, Sept. 16, 2016. The police chief in Tulsa says Crutcher, a black man fatally shot by a white police officer responding to a stalled vehicle, had no weapon on him or in his SUV. Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday Sept. 19, 2016, that an investigation is underway into the shooting death. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
In this image made from a Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, top, is pursued by police officers as he walk to an SUV in Tulsa, Okla. Crutcher was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead after he was shot by the officer around 8 p.m., Friday, police said. Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
In this image made from a Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, is pursued by police officers as he walks to an SUV in Tulsa, Okla. Crutcher was fatally shot Friday after authorities say an officer stopped to investigate the stalled vehicle and Crutcher approached after officers arrived to assist. Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
In this image made from a Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, center, is pursued by police officers as he walk to an SUV in Tulsa, Okla. Crutcher was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead after he was shot by the officer around 8 p.m., Friday, police said. Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATHA still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher after being shot during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATHA still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher after being shot during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
A still image captured from a dashcam video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher seen with his hands in the air followed by police officers during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
A still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher seen with his hands in the air followed by a police officer with a drawn weapon during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
A still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher seen with his hands in the air during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATHA still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher after being shot during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FILE - In this photo made from a Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, with his arms up is pursued by police officers as he walks next to his stalled SUV moments before he was shot and killed by one of the officers in Tulsa, Okla. Recent shootings by police raise a fundamental question: In the moments after officers shoot someone, how soon can medical aid be given? (Tulsa Police Department via AP, File)
In this photo made from a Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, lowers his right arm as he is pursued by police officers moments before he was shot and killed by one of the officers in Tulsa, Okla. When it comes to charging an officer, legal experts say, the most important determination isn't whether the officer was actually in danger in hindsight. It's whether the officer reasonably believed in his or her own mind that they or fellow officers were in danger at the split second they choose to shoot. There's no clear, standard formula investigators can rely on to answer the question of whether an officer's belief that he or she's in peril is reasonable, a former federal prosecutor in Chicago said. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
In this photo made from a Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, with his arms up is pursued by police officers as he walks next to his stalled SUV moments before he was shot and killed by one of the officers in Tulsa, Okla. When it comes to charging an officer, legal experts say, the most important determination isn't whether the officer was actually in danger in hindsight. It's whether the officer reasonably believed in his or her own mind that they or fellow officers were in danger at the split second they choose to shoot. There's no clear, standard formula investigators can rely on to answer the question of whether an officer's belief that he or she's in peril is reasonable, a former federal prosecutor in Chicago said. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
HIDE CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION

"This is a small victory," said Crutcher's twin sister, Tiffany Crutcher. "The chain breaks here. We're going to break the chains of police brutality... We know the history."

Footage of the shooting and its aftermath showed Crutcher walking away from the officer with his arms in the air, but the footage does not provide a clear view of when Shelby fired the fatal shot. Shelby's attorneys say she fired at Crutcher because he reached into his SUV window.

"I pray this decision provides some peace to the Crutcher family and the people of Tulsa," Gov. Mary Fallin, R-Okla., said in statement. "But we must remain patient as the case works its way through the justice system, where a jury likely will be asked to decide whether officer Betty Shelby is guilty of the crime. And we must remember that in our justice system, officer Shelby is innocent until proven guilty."


Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners