'There's no need for that': Local ABC reporter asks Clinton if she needs neurological tests

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A Florida ABC reporter asked Hillary Clinton this week whether she would release information about her neurological state following her pneumonia diagnosis.

During an interview with Florida ABC affiliate WFTS-TV, reporter Sarina Fazan asked the Democratic presidential nominee if she should undergo a neurological exam following her recent bout of pneumonia, and subsequent stumble while getting into a van leaving a 9/11 memorial event.

"It was startling to many Americans to see you get into that van, I certainly hope you're feeling better," Fazan said.

Hillary after her pneumonia

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Hillary Clinton campaigning after pneumonia
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Hillary Clinton campaigning after pneumonia
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gives a thumbs up as she boards her campaign plane in White Plains, New York, United States September 15, 2016, to resume her campaign schedule following a bout with pneumonia. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton boards her campaign plane in White Plains, New York, United States September 15, 2016, to resume her campaign schedule following a bout with pneumonia. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a campaign rally in Greensboro, North Carolina, United States, September 15, 2016, after she resumed her campaign schedule following a bout with pneumonia. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a campaign rally in Greensboro, North Carolina, United States, September 15, 2016, after she resumed her campaign schedule following a bout with pneumonia. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves after speaking at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute's 39th Annual Gala Dinner in Washington, DC, U.S. September 15, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute's 39th Annual Gala Dinner in Washington, DC, U.S. September 15, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Black Women's Agenda Annual Symposium in Washington, U.S., September 16, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waves as she boards her campaign plane in Washington, U.S., September 16, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton reacts as she receives the CBC Trailblazer Award during the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's Phoenix Awards Dinner at the Washington convention center in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton speaks at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's Phoenix Awards Dinner in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2016. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to the media before boarding her campaign plane at the Westchester County airport in White Plains, New York, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton talks to reporters about the explosion in Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York, as she arrives at the Westchester County airport in White Plains, U.S., September 17, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton attends a bilateral meeting with Egypt's President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi (R) at a hotel in New York, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at a hotel in New York, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton attends a bilateral meeting with Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko (R) at a hotel in New York, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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She added: "Some doctors have said because of your age, as well as your opponent's age, that you could be at higher risk for dementia or even Alzheimer's, and have suggested that you take some neurological test. Would you be willing to do that?"

Clinton laughed at the suggestion, pointing to a recent detailed look at her health history that found her in "excellent mental condition."

"I'm very sorry I got pneumonia, and I'm glad anti-biotics took care of it, and that's behind us now," Clinton said. "I am physically and mentally healthy and fit to serve as president of the United States."

When Fazan pressed, Clinton clarified that she would likely not release a neurological test.

"There's no need for that. The information is very clear, and the information, as I said, meets the standards that every other president has ever had to meet," Clinton said.

Though Clinton's health has been a fixation of fringe right-wing sites for months, Clinton's abrupt departure from the 9/11 event and subsequent pneumonia diagnosis disclosure sparked more serious inquiry into the health of both presidential nominees.

Many sites have fixated on a concussion Clinton suffered in 2011 that later led to the discovery of a blood clot in her brain. Multiple medical reports released by the campaign found that she recovered within months from the concussion and subsequent blood clot without health complications.

For his part, Donald Trump made the release of a summary of his health into a media spectacle on the Dr. Oz Show. The summary lauded Trump's health, but omitted specific details about elements like Trump's orthopedic state, and nutrition and exercise.

As the New York Times notes, neither Trump not Clinton have agreed to take neurological tests, despite some calls for both to do so.

NOW WATCH: Clinton opens up a massive lead against Trump, with lopsided support from a key voting demographic

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