Tulsa cop Betty Shelby's past under scrutiny after Terence Crutcher shooting

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The white Oklahoma police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man last week is under a federal investigation after the man's family demanded she face criminal charges.

Now, Tulsa police Officer Betty Shelby's work history and past conduct are under scrutiny as authorities probe whether the five-year department veteran acted within reason or was unjustified in the killing of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher.

Cameras captured the Sept. 16 incident in which Shelby, 42, and other cops were called to a broken down SUV in the middle of a road.

Photos of Officer Shelby and the shooting

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Cop shoots unarmed man in Tulsa
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This undated photo provided by the Tulsa Oklahoma Police Department shows officer Betty Shelby. Police say Tulsa officer Shelby fired the fatal shot that killed 40 year-old Terence Crutcher, Sept. 16, 2016. The police chief in Tulsa says Crutcher, a black man fatally shot by a white police officer responding to a stalled vehicle, had no weapon on him or in his SUV. Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday Sept. 19, 2016, that an investigation is underway into the shooting death. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
In this image made from a Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, top, is pursued by police officers as he walk to an SUV in Tulsa, Okla. Crutcher was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead after he was shot by the officer around 8 p.m., Friday, police said. Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
In this image made from a Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, is pursued by police officers as he walks to an SUV in Tulsa, Okla. Crutcher was fatally shot Friday after authorities say an officer stopped to investigate the stalled vehicle and Crutcher approached after officers arrived to assist. Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
In this image made from a Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, center, is pursued by police officers as he walk to an SUV in Tulsa, Okla. Crutcher was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead after he was shot by the officer around 8 p.m., Friday, police said. Crutcher had no weapon on him or in his SUV, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATHA still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher after being shot during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATHA still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher after being shot during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
A still image captured from a dashcam video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher seen with his hands in the air followed by police officers during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
A still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher seen with his hands in the air followed by a police officer with a drawn weapon during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
A still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher seen with his hands in the air during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATHA still image captured from a video from Tulsa Police Department shows Terence Crutcher after being shot during a police shooting incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. on September 16, 2016. Video taken September 16, 2016. Courtesy Tulsa Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FILE - In this photo made from a Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, with his arms up is pursued by police officers as he walks next to his stalled SUV moments before he was shot and killed by one of the officers in Tulsa, Okla. Recent shootings by police raise a fundamental question: In the moments after officers shoot someone, how soon can medical aid be given? (Tulsa Police Department via AP, File)
In this photo made from a Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, lowers his right arm as he is pursued by police officers moments before he was shot and killed by one of the officers in Tulsa, Okla. When it comes to charging an officer, legal experts say, the most important determination isn't whether the officer was actually in danger in hindsight. It's whether the officer reasonably believed in his or her own mind that they or fellow officers were in danger at the split second they choose to shoot. There's no clear, standard formula investigators can rely on to answer the question of whether an officer's belief that he or she's in peril is reasonable, a former federal prosecutor in Chicago said. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
In this photo made from a Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, with his arms up is pursued by police officers as he walks next to his stalled SUV moments before he was shot and killed by one of the officers in Tulsa, Okla. When it comes to charging an officer, legal experts say, the most important determination isn't whether the officer was actually in danger in hindsight. It's whether the officer reasonably believed in his or her own mind that they or fellow officers were in danger at the split second they choose to shoot. There's no clear, standard formula investigators can rely on to answer the question of whether an officer's belief that he or she's in peril is reasonable, a former federal prosecutor in Chicago said. (Tulsa Police Department via AP)
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Shelby's attorney, Scott Wood, told NBC News on Tuesday that Crutcher failed to listen to her commands when police arrived and he appeared to be under the influence of narcotics, possibly PCP. While Crutcher did have his hands up, he went to the side of his car — prompting Shelby to fire her gun and another officer to use his Taser simultaneously, Wood said.

More from NBC News: Terence Crutcher Remembered as a Church-Going, Family Ma

The case is the latest involving the death of an African-American at the hands of police, and has attracted the attention of Black Lives Matter protesters who are calling for increased transparency into what happened. This much is known publicly about the officer involved.

Shelby's husband, also a police officer, was seated in the helicopter that circled the area during the time of the shooting.

The Tulsa Police Department on Monday released aerial footage of the incident. The video includes Shelby's husband, Dave Shelby, and an unidentified pilot telling each other that they believe the "black dude" in the scene was dangerous and "needed to be tasered" for not following commands.

Tulsa police spokesman Sgt. Shane Tuell later said that Dave Shelby wasn't the person who commented on Crutcher's appearance and called his presence in the area of the shooting a "happenstance" because his helicopter had not been assigned to that specific call.

Tuell also said the critical remarks about Crutcher weren't heard by Betty Shelby because they weren't made over shared radio communications.

The Crutcher family's lawyer, Benjamin Crump, said at a news conference Tuesday that cameras captured Crutcher walking with his hands raised and that the car's windows were also up, so he couldn't have been reaching into his car for some sort of weapon. No weapons were found on him or in his car, police said.

In addition, Tuell said Shelby had a stun gun on her at the time, but did not use it, according to The Associated Press.

Shelby is a drug-recognition expert and has admitted to previously using marijuana.

Wood said Shelby completed drug-recognition expert training and that she believed Crutcher was under the influence at the time of the encounter.

Tulsa Police Sgt. Dave Walker told the Tulsa World on Tuesday that investigators did recover a vial of PCP, the hallucinogen also known as Angel Dust, in his SUV.

Before her employment with the Tulsa police in 2011, Shelby was a deputy for the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office.

In her application with the sheriff's office in 2007 — publicly disclosed Monday — she circled "yes" when asked whether she had "possessed and used illegal drugs" in the past. The sheriff's office released a letter in which Shelby described using marijuana twice at age 18 during social gatherings.

Protests surrounding Terence Crutcher's death

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Protests surrounding Terence Crutcher's death
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Protests surrounding Terence Crutcher's death
FILE - In this photo made from a Sept. 16, 2016 police video, Terence Crutcher, left, with his arms up is pursued by police officers as he walks next to his stalled SUV moments before he was shot and killed by one of the officers in Tulsa, Okla. Recent shootings by police raise a fundamental question: In the moments after officers shoot someone, how soon can medical aid be given? (Tulsa Police Department via AP, File)
People hold signs at a "protest for justice" over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
People hold signs at a "protest for justice" over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Mary Williams, left, bows her head as Pastor Allen Jamison, right, says a prayer at the start of at a "protest for justice" over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
People hold signs at a "protest for justice" over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Pastor Jennettie Marshall, of Living Sanctuary Evangelistic Ministries, speaks at a "protest for justice" over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Marq Lewis, right, of We The People Oklahoma, stresses that the "protest for justice" over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma, will remain peaceful, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Protesters calling for the arrest of Officer Betty Shelby, who shot dead unarmed motorist Terence Crutcher, demonstrate outside the Tulsa Police headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
Eight year-old Angelo Estes Jr. calls for the arrest of Officer Betty Shelby, who shot dead unarmed motorist Terence Crutcher, with other protesters outside the Tulsa Police headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Nick Oxford TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Adrian Colbert raises his fist at a protest calling for the arrest of Officer Betty Shelby, who shot dead unarmed motorist Terence Crutcher, outside the Tulsa Police headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
Rev. Warren Blakney speaks to protesters calling for the arrest of Officer Betty Shelby, who shot dead unarmed motorist Terence Crutcher, outside the Tulsa Police headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
Protesters calling for the arrest of Officer Betty Shelby, who shot dead unarmed motorist Terence Crutcher, demonstrate outside the Tulsa Police headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
Protesters calling for the arrest of Officer Betty Shelby, who shot dead unarmed motorist Terence Crutcher, demonstrate outside the Tulsa Police headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S. September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
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Shelby was in the Oklahoma National Air Guard before going into law enforcement.

According to her police job application, Shelby ended employment with the QuickTrip convenience store chain in 1999 to start a trainee program with the Oklahoma National Air Guard.

In May 2000, after joining the Oklahoma National Air Guard, she left after spraining her knee.

She also had a brief stint as a teaching assistant in Tulsa schools from 2001-02 before pursuing a bachelor of science degree in biology at Northeastern State University in Oklahoma. She was hired by the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office in 2007.

Shelby had no disciplinary actions against her while working at the sheriff's office.

Her superiors said she and other deputies in 2010 pulled guns on a man who was trying to hide while a felony warrant was being served. But there was no record of disciplinary action against her, they said.

In her job application with the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office in which she described her marijuana use, Shelby also said she had two previous domestic-related incidents involving the courts.

In 1993, she said, she and her then-boyfriend each damaged one another's vehicles when they were breaking up. They had temporary restraining orders filed that were subsequently dismissed.

In 2002, she said, her ex-husband's new wife filed a protective order claiming Shelby made harassing phone calls to her. The protective order was later denied, Shelby said in her application: "The Judge saw that I was not guilty of the accusations made against me ... ."

Shelby has been praised for helping the community.

Tulsa police posted on Facebook when Shelby helped a couple named the Joneses locate their stolen property in August.

Shelby had "responded to gather information on the crime" and was able to retrieve the Joneses' unspecified stolen property and return it to them. The Joneses presented Shelby with a bouquet of flowers as a mark of their gratitude, police said.

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