New NRA commercial claims Clinton will leave voters unprotected

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The National Rifle Association released its latest ad in support of Donald Trump on Tuesday, claiming a vote for Hillary Clinton would leave them defenseless.

The NRA's new commercial, which is part of a $5 million campaign, depicts a woman reacting to a break in at her house. A narrator claims, "Hillary Clinton would take away her right to self defense, and with Supreme Court justices, Hillary can."

The ad also tells viewers that the average 911 response time is 11 minutes, claiming Clinton would leave voters with nothing but a phone to protect them.

Click through images from NRA convention:

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NRA convention 2015
A convention goers aims a Tavor SAR IDF model semi-automatic weapon at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. This is the civilian version of the Tavor Tar-21, issued to Israeli Defense Forces. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibitor holds up a Bond Arms Ranger II derringer at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Wayne LaPierre, left, executive vice president of the National Rifle Association, speaks during the annual meeting of members at the NRA convention Saturday, April 11, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. At right is Jim Porter, NRA president. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Pat Kirchner, of Kankakee, Ill., looks through a pair of binoculars at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Friday, April 25, 2014 in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)
Jerry Miller, of Georgetown, Texas, looks over a rifle at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Friday, April 25, 2014 in Indianapolis. Several potential Republican contenders for president will court gun-rights supporters at the NRA's annual convention Friday. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)
Attendees look over a pistol display at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Friday, April 25, 2014 in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)
A convention goer looks at rifle scopes at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. This is the civilian version of the Tavor Tar-21, issued to Israeli Defense Forces. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibitor holds up an Armscor/Rock Island Armory titanium 1911 series prototype handgun at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibitor holds up a Bond Arms Ranger II derringer at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A convention goer checks out a rifle scope April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A girl looks at Sig Sauer P320 handguns April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Convention goers look at old west handguns at the A. Uberti booth April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. Uberti firearms are exacting replicas, down to the finest detail. Many are improvements over the originals, with the advancement of materials and the use of modern machinery. Today, A. Uberti produces black powder revolvers, cartridge revolvers and cartridge rifles. The firearms set the standard by which Cowboy Action Shooting competitors and big game hunters judge other vintage firearms. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman aims a shotgun April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A boy under his parents' supervision, aims a shotgun April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Convention goers on the floor April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee.AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Convention goers look at weapons April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibitor holds up a Bond Arms Ranger II derringer at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Convention goers look at old west handguns at the A. Uberti booth April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. Uberti firearms are exacting replicas, down to the finest detail. Many are improvements over the originals, with the advancement of materials and the use of modern machinery. Today, A. Uberti produces black powder revolvers, cartridge revolvers and cartridge rifles. The firearms set the standard by which Cowboy Action Shooting competitors and big game hunters judge other vintage firearms. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
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Both Trump and the gun rights organization have repeatedly claimed that Clinton wants to "take your guns away," despite there being no mention of seizing guns from average citizens in her gun policy. The policy mostly focuses on expanded background checks and limiting access for those with a history of violence or mental illness.

Trump recently came under fire for suggesting Clinton's Secret Service detail should give up their guns, then adding, "let's see what happens to her."

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