Trump says he would reverse Obama's deal with Cuba if country fails to meet his demands

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If Cuba doesn't comply with his demands, Donald Trump said on Friday, he'll cut off the freshly re-established trade and diplomatic channels between the country and the United States.

The comments came during a rally in Miami, Florida, according to Reuters — a city with a large Cuban population, due in large part to its proximity to the island nation.

During his second term in office, President Barack Obama made efforts to repair the strained diplomatic relationship between the U.S. and Cuba that had existed since the Cold War. He reduced restrictions on travel and trade with the country, according to MSNBC .

But on Friday, Trump called the measures taken by the Obama administration "one-sided," and said that they benefitted "only the Castro regime," according to CNN.

Related: Fact about Donald Trump's health:

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Donald Trump health facts, according to his doctor
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Donald Trump health facts, according to his doctor

Cholesterol: 169

(Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

HDL cholesterol: 63

(Photo by Matt McClain/ The Washington Post via Getty Images)

LDL cholesterol: 94

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trigylcerides: 61

(Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

Blood Pressure: 116/70

(Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Testosterone: 441.6 

REUTERS/Mike Segar

Colonoscopy: Performed July 10, 2013 and "revealed no polyps."

(Photo by Steve Pope/Getty Images)

"His liver function and thyroid function testes are all within normal range," Borenstein said.

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

He had a transthoracic echocardiogram on December 16, 2014 and "within the range of normal," according to Borenstein.

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump takes a "lipid lowering agent (rosuvastatin) for his cholesterol and a "low dose of aspirin," Borenstein said.

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

"Mr. Trump's parents, Mary and Fred (pictured), lived into their 80s and 90s," Borenstein wrote.

(Photo by Dan Farrell/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
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"All of the concessions that Barack Obama has granted the Castro regime were done with executive order, which means the next president can reverse them," he said. "And that is what I will do unless the Castro regime meets our demands."

Those "demands," Trump said, include "religious and political freedom for the Cuban people," and "the freeing of political prisoners," the latter of which CNN notes was absent from the copy of Trump's prepared remarks, giving it the appearance of having been improvised on the spot.

Cuba did release 53 political prisoners in 2014 as part of its deal to reopen diplomatic ties with the United States, according to CNN.

Trump's criticism of the Obama administration's deal with Cuba is a departure from comments he has made in the past that seemingly showed his support of improved relations.

As recently as March, Trump told CNN that opening a hotel in the country was something he would consider.

"Maybe it won't work out, but I will tell you, I think Cuba has a certain potential and I think it's OK to bring Cuba into the fold," he said.

Related: Ordinary Cubans' hopes for change amid Obama's deal:
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Ordinary Cubans hope for change after Obama's visit
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Ordinary Cubans hope for change after Obama's visit
Yoendry Gainsa, 35, a bricklayer, holds his daughter while posing for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Gainsa said "I hope everything gets better and that there will be better work and development for our children. Long live Obama." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Carlos Alvarez, 54, poses with his pet parrot for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Alvarez said "New changes, it was a blessing that he came and God willing the new U.S. president will do the same. Obama is an example." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Jimmy Blanco, 9, holds a corncob while posing for a photograph in front of the Cuban and the U.S. flags in Havana, March 23, 2016. Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Paloma Duarte, 18, a dancer, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 23, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Duarte said "Developed the communication between us. We have family here and there (in the U.S.) and an urgent need to be able to go." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 23, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Zamora, 55, self-employed, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags after buying a pineapple in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Zamora said "It's good for the Cubans that he came and re-established relationships between the two countries." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Jurangel, 25, a dancer, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Jurangel said "Spectacular." Picture taken March 25, 2016. Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Lazaro Roger, 56, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 23, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Roger said "This is grand, historical and very positive that the USA have realized after all these years that the embargo is not worth it." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 23, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Raciel Cardoso, 30, a musician, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 23, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Cardoso said "This is very good, the perfect union between two countries, and that everything changes now for the better." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 23, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Manuel, 52, a bricklayer, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Manuel said "I hope with this visit there will be a little more survival." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Concha gestures while posing for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Concha said "A life struggle." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Eric, 3, gestures while posing for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Pascual Montero, 86, who collects plastic containers from restaurants and resells them, smokes a cigar while posing in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Montero said, "It was perfect and I have hopes that some day a lot of problems can be resolved." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Guillermo Manzano, 54, a welder, eats cake while posing for a photograph in front of Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 23, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Manzano said, "The best, the greatest thing that has entered this country." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 23, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Yaneisy, 28, between jobs, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Yaneisy said, "I don't care." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Sarah Maria, 50, a transvestite, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 23, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Maria said "I believe this could be very important for my country." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 23, 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
Irma Diaz, 55, a housewife, poses for a photograph in front of the Cuban and U.S. flags in Havana, March 25, 2016. Regarding Obama's historic visit to the island, Diaz said "I am happy with the friendship between Raul (Castro) and Obama." Struggling under a U.S. embargo and still only cautiously emerging from a Soviet-style economy that prohibited almost all private enterprise, many Cubans find it hard to make ends meet. Residents of Havana hope that U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Cuba last month will bring material improvements to their lives. Picture taken March 25 2016. (REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)
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