George W. Bush appears to take dig at Trump over slogan

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Former President George W. Bush may have subtly taken a dig at Donald Trump this week during an appearance at an elementary school in Texas.

Bush attended a naming ceremony at the first school in the state to bear his name on Thursday afternoon in a suburb of Dallas.

After a tour of the school, Bush took to Instagram to share video of the adorable students singing the president a tune about accepting diversity.

RELATED: Newly-released photos of Bush on 9/11

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Newly-released photos of President Bush on 9/11 (BI)
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Newly-released photos of President Bush on 9/11 (BI)

President George W. Bush participates in a reading demonstration on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001, at Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

Dan Bartlett, deputy assistant to the president, points to news footage of the attacks while President Bush listens to new security information.

(Photo via US National Archives)

President Bush watches television coverage of the attacks on the World Trade Center during a briefing in the classroom.

President Bush takes notes as he listens to news coverage of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush calls New York Gov. George Pataki, FBI Director Robert Mueller, and Vice President Dick Cheney. White House Chief of Staff Andy Card talks on a cellphone.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush delivers remarks to the nation, regarding the terrorist attacks on US soil, from the elementary school.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

A highway sign on Tuesday, September 11, 2001.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush watches television coverage of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center from his office aboard Air Force One.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush confers with White House Chief of Staff Andy Card in the president's stateroom.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush confers with staff by telephone, from his office aboard Air Force One, during the flight from Sarasota to Barksdale Air Force Base.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush talks on the telephone as senior staff huddle in his office.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush and his staff look out the windows of Air Force One at their F-16 escort while en route to Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

An F-16 escorts Air Force One.

(Photo via US National Archives)

President Bush confers with, from left, Karl Rove, Andy Card, Dan Bartlett, and Ari Fleischer before delivering remarks on the World Trade Center disaster from the General Dougherty Conference Center at Barksdale Air Force Base.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush delivers remarks on the terrorist attacks before departing for Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush arrives at Offutt Air Force Base.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush, Admiral Richard Mies (left), and White House Chief of Staff Andy Card conduct a video teleconference at Offutt Air Force Base.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush and White House Counsel Harriet Miers aboard Air Force One.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush speaks with Ari Fleischer (left) and Karl Rove aboard Air Force One during the flight to Andrews Air Force Base.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

After departing Offutt Air Force Base for Washington, DC, President Bush talks on the phone with Vice President Dick Cheney from Air Force One.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice waits at the South Portico for President Bush to arrive at the White House.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

Counselor Karen Hughes and Counsel Alberto Gonzales follow President Bush into the Oval Office after his return to the White House.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

Working with his senior staff, President Bush reviews the speech that he will deliver to the nation in the evening.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush talks with Vice President Dick Cheney in the President's Emergency Operations Center.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

Laura Bush listens as her husband discusses the terrorist attacks with White House staff in the President's Emergency Operations Center.

(Photo via US National Archives)

President Bush and Laura Bush talk with Vice President Dick Cheney and National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice in the President's Emergency Operations Center.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

After returning to the White House, President Bush meets with, from left, Vice President Dick Cheney), Chief of Staff Andy Card, National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice, and Special Agent Carl Truscott of the US Secret Service in the President's Emergency Operations Center.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

President Bush reviews notes with Karen Hughes before addressing the nation from the Oval Office.

(Photo via US National Archives)

President Bush delivers his televised address.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

After addressing the nation, President Bush meets with his National Security Council in the President's Emergency Operations Center.

(Photo via The U.S. National Archives)

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The kids' performance won praise from Bush and all who saw, but it wasn't just the video that piqued people's interest.

At the end of the post, the former president wrote, "Spending time with these students gave me confidence that our great state and country will continue to be great."

Many began to assume that the line was a dig on Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" campaign slogan.

SEE ALSO: Mark Cuban offers Donald Trump $10 million for one-on-one interview with 'no one else in the room to help'

George's brother, Jeb, was a frequent critic of Trump's during the campaign primary cycle that saw him fall from front-runner status to failed hopeful. The younger Bush repeatedly warned during his campaign events that his divisive rhetoric was bad for America and the Republican Party.

The Bush family has been notably quiet since Jeb Bush left the race. Most high-profile members of the political dynasty have so far refused to back the Republican nominee, including both former presidents. However, Jeb Bush's son George P. Bush, the Texas land commissioner and GOP victory chairman in Texas, did reluctantly endorse Trump in August.

Trump spoke of the lack of endorsement from Jeb Bush scornfully in June.

"Who the hell cares?" he said to supporters at a rally.

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