Man under fire for holding gun to dog's head says he's sorry

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SHEFFIELD, Ala. - Was a man pushed to apologize because of public outrage over a social media post? It sure seems that way.

Both the Sheffield and Florence Police Departments have been searching for Zachary Wade Moore Jr. for over a week. In pictures posted to social media last week, Moore held what appeared to be a gun to a puppy's head while holding the dog by the scruff of its neck.

Local police wanted to talk with Moore, but it was law enforcement officers in another state who finally caught up with him.

Working on a tip, the Tishomingo County Sheriff's Office and Belmont Police located Moore over the weekend.

According to Belmont Investigator Donald Ray, Moore was brought in for questioning. This may have prompted a video posted on Facebook by Moore.

"On this dog situation, look world, I'm sorry, it was a mistake. Just me messing around on Facebook and it went way out of control," Moore said in the posted video.

Belmont Police said Moore told them he had been drinking with friends and was playing around with a toy gun that night at a home in Golden, Mississippi.

The dog, investigators said, was a runaway and didn't belong to Moore. Deputies recovered it and took it back to its rightful owners.

Investigators who questioned Moore said he kept admitting how stupid he was that night.

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This undated photo provided by Crown Media United States, LLC, shows Glory, a 3-year-old yellow Labrador and an ignitable liquid detection K-9 who started out as an assistance dog, and is owned by Keith Lynn of Evansville, Wis. Both work for the Beloit, Wis., Fire Department. Glory has two specialties: finding accelerants and identifying firefighters who are having a bad day and spending time with them. “My dog’s a hero because she touches people, she’s very calm and docile, just a ham. She loves everybody."(Chris Valenziano/Crown Media United States, LLC via AP)
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"The gun was fake, the dog was never harmed. I would never hurt a dog, animal at that. The gun was fake [throws it down]," Moore said on the video.

Mississippi authorities have not charged Moore with any crimes at this point. However, law enforcement in the Shoals would still like to speak with him.

The video apology by Zachary Wade Moore Jr. had nearly 20,000 plays on Facebook by the afternoon of Monday, September 12.

WHNT News 19 will continue to follow any further developments in this bizarre case.

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