FBI chief: Put tape over your webcam

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FBI director James Comey is just as concerned about data security as anyone else — that's why he covers his webcam with a piece of tape. On Wednesday, Comey recommended others do the same at a conference at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

"There's some sensible things you should be doing, and that's one of them," said Comey, as reported by The Hill. "You do that so that people who don't have authority don't look at you. I think that's a good thing."

From Comey, that strikes many as a bit hypocritical. In April, when Comey first said he covered his camera, many in the internet security community found his remarks laughable, given that the FBI has used malware to attack computer cams, and last year went after Apple to compel the company to access the phone of San Bernardino terrorist Syed Rizwan Farook, which they were later able to crack on their own.

Democratic congress members whose numbers were released in a data hack:

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Hack reveals Democratic Congress members' phone numbers
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Hack reveals Democratic Congress members' phone numbers
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 11: Rep. Corrine Brown, D-Fla., attends a news conference at the DNC where members of the Congressional Black Caucus PAC endorsed Hillary Clinton for president, February 11, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Representative James Clyburn, a Democrat from South Carolina, speaks during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Thursday, July 28, 2016. Division among Democrats has been overcome through speeches from two presidents, another first lady and a vice-president, who raised the stakes for their candidate by warning that her opponent posed an unprecedented threat to American diplomacy. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JUNE 29: Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., attends a rally with lawmakers and gun violence victims to call for action on gun safety measures on the steps of the Cathedral of the Incarnation in Baltimore, Md., June 29, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MAY 16: Rep. John Garamendi, D-Calif., speaks at a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center on the Smith-Amash Amendment to the FY2013 National Defense Authorization Act that would 'prevent the indefinite detention of and use of military custody for individuals detained on U.S. soil - including U.S. citizens - and ensure access to due process and the federal court system, as the Constitution provides.' (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 21: Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., speaks with a reporter at the Senate subway on Tuesday, July 21, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., talks to reporters as members of the House of Representatives received a closed intelligence briefing from FBI Director James Comey and Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson on the mass shooting at an LGBT club in Orlando, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 14, 2016. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Sanford Bishop, D-Ga., speaks during a commemoration ceremony for the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which abolished slavery in the United States, Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2015, in Emancipation Hall on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Rep. Robert Brady, D-Penn., speaks during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia , Monday, July 25, 2016. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Charlie Rangel, D-NY, speaks about the New York Police Department's stop and frisk policy, Thursday, June 7, 2012, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)
Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, speaks during the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia , Thursday, July 28, 2016. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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Security researcher and activist Chris Soghoian expressed the irony of Comey using a piece of tape to protect from surveillance in April.

Comey acknowledged that he was "much mocked for that," on Wednesday. He also tried to make the case that although he is a human in charge of a massive domestic surveillance apparatus, he is also just a human being."It's not crazy that the FBI director cares about personal security as well," he said. "So I think people ought to take responsibility for their own safety and security."

So cover your cam!

The post FBI Chief: Put Tape Over Your Webcam appeared first on Vocativ.

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