Pink water of Lake Hillier in Australia defies scientific explanation

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This bubble-gum pink lake defies science. Lake Hillier in Western Australia has some scientists scratching their heads. Because the exact reason behind the lake's pink color isn't fully understood.

Some believe the vibrant color is made by a type of microalgae found in the lake. Others think it's because of an interaction between the lake's salt crusts and bacteria.

SEE ALSO: The world's most beautiful island is paradise defined

Lake Hillier isn't the only pink lake in the world, but what makes it different is the water never loses its pinkish hue.

The color of other pink lakes fluctuates with the outside temperature. While you scientists say the water is harmless to humans, don't expect to be living out your whimsical dreams by swimming in it.

The lake is found on an island off the coast of Australia and is only used for research purposes.

RELATED: Check out this lake in Tanzania that is home to over half the world's population of lesser flamingos:

7 PHOTOS
Lake Natron
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Lake Natron
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY HELEN VESPERINI- Lesser flamingoes are pictured on September 30, 2011 in Lake Natron. Salmon-coloured clouds of flamingoes sweeping overhead is a common sight at east Africa's Rift Valley lakes, but the mounds of mud where they lay their eggs are found only here. The caustic waters of Lake Natron form the only breeding ground for east Africa's endangered lesser flamingoes, but the Tanzanian government is determined to revive plans to build a soda ash plant at the lake. AFP PHOTO/TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY HELEN VESPERINI- Lesser flamingoes are pictured on September 30, 2011 in Lake Natron. Salmon-coloured clouds of flamingoes sweeping overhead is a common sight at east Africa's Rift Valley lakes, but the mounds of mud where they lay their eggs are found only here. The caustic waters of Lake Natron form the only breeding ground for east Africa's endangered lesser flamingoes, but the Tanzanian government is determined to revive plans to build a soda ash plant at the lake. AFP PHOTO/TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY HELEN VESPERINI- Lesser flamingoes fly over Lake Natron on September 30, 2011. Salmon-coloured clouds of flamingoes sweeping overhead is a common sight at east Africa's Rift Valley lakes, but the mounds of mud where they lay their eggs are found only here. The caustic waters of Lake Natron form the only breeding ground for east Africa's endangered lesser flamingoes, but the Tanzanian government is determined to revive plans to build a soda ash plant at the lake. AFP PHOTO/TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
KENYA - CIRCA 1900: Kenya - Lake Natron beaten by the sand winds. (Photo by Jean-Luc MANAUD/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY HELEN VESPERINI- Lesser flamingoes are pictured in Lake Natron on September 30, 2011. Salmon-coloured clouds of flamingoes sweeping overhead is a common sight at east Africa's Rift Valley lakes, but the mounds of mud where they lay their eggs are found only here. The caustic waters of Lake Natron form the only breeding ground for east Africa's endangered lesser flamingoes, but the Tanzanian government is determined to revive plans to build a soda ash plant at the lake. AFP PHOTO/TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE---In this 2009 file photo Lesser Flamingoes are seen at lake Natron, Tanzania. Flamingoes in Tanzania's Lake Natron will face a major threat if Tanzania starts mining soda ash from the lake, a wildlife group said Wednesday, Aug 26, 2009. Three-quarters of the world's population of Lesser Flamingoes live and breed in East Africa. Many depend on Tanzania's Lake Natron as a breeding site, the group BirdLife International said. Tanzania's Environment Minister, Batilda Buriani, said the country was still awaiting an environmental assessment before making a final decision, but added "we want to do it in a such way that the flamingos and animals are not affected." Lesser Flamingo stand between four and five feet high, but are the smallest of the six flamingo species.(AP Photo/James Warwick, File)
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