A 14-year-old girl is suing Facebook for hosting naked photos of her

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On Monday, a judge in Belfast ruled a 14-year-old girl's case against Facebook would be allowed to go forward. The girl, whose naked photo was reportedly posted on a shame page "several times" between November 2014 and January 2016, is suing the tech giant for misuse of private information, negligence, and breach of the U.K.'s Data Protection Act, The Guardian reports. She's also filing charges against the man who posted her photo in the first place.

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The teenager's lawyer equated Facebook allowing the image to be posted with child abuse and argued that the company had the power to prevent it from being republished thanks to a tracking system, which it neglected to use.

Revenge porn — or the posting of sexually explicit images without the subject's consent — is a notoriously tricky issue to legislate, but more and more U.S. states are introducing specific statutes criminalizing it. As of last year, 18 states in the U.S. had criminal revenge-porn laws, and bills were pending in 20 more. Of course, in some cases revenge porn lawsuits are won thanks to statutes already on the books; lawyers have historically used copyright law to get sexually explicit images taken down, and others have relied on stalking and harassment laws.

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Facebook over the years
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Facebook over the years

The original Facebook homepage from 2004 with a small picture of Al Pacino in the top left corner.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Mark Zuckerberg originally described himself as not only the founder of Facebook, but also as the "Master and Commander" and "Enemy of the State."

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Here's what a Facebook group page looked like in 2005.

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For comparison, this is what a Facebook group page looks like today.

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The Facebook homepage in 2005 also listed all of the schools the social network was in -- and still included the photo of Al Pacino.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

The company decided to drop the "the" from its name in 2005, after it bought the domain Facebook.com for $200,000.

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We love this gem about "poking" from one of the original FAQ pages.

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Facebook's homepage in 2006 was a stripped-back affair, doing away with the list of schools in favor of a simple login option.

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Mark Zuckerberg's profile in 2006.

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Facebook launched the News Feed to display all your friends' activity in a single timeline in 2006.

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At the same time, Facebook introduced the Mini-Feed. But the entire concept of a News Feed resulted in some very public outrage. Some users even went so far to call one of Facebook's product managers the devil.

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Facebook's 2007 homepage contained the first instance of its now-synonymous logo and offered the "latest news" from friends.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

The Facebook of 2008 continued to refine the homepage and offered options for signing up.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Facebook gained the "connected world" diagram in 2009, which lasted all the way until 2011.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

In 2009, Facebook's home page also got a facelift. Posts started to stream through the News Feed in real-time.

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That same year, Facebook also introduced its algorithm for determining the order in which status updates should be displayed.

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Facebook changed its logo font in 2010 but left the homepage much the same.

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2010 was also when Facebook brought notifications to the top navigation bar following yet another redesign.

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Facebook also rolled out a new, more visual profile in 2010. It added a row of recently tagged images below your name and basic profile information.

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Facebook left the design the same in 2011, but made the input boxes used to log in clearer.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Facebook launched the News Ticker in 2011 so users could keep up with their friends while browsing through other parts of Facebook.

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The Facebook Timeline feels like it's been around since the beginning. But it launched in 2011 to act as a virtual timeline of your entire life.

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Facebook also split its instant messaging into a different app called Messenger in 2011. It's now got more than 800 million monthly users.

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Facebook swapped out the connected world diagram for a phone in 2012 as its users moved from desktop to mobile. Today, over 800 million people access Facebook on mobile everyday.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Facebook started flooding the News Feed with sponsored stories in January 2012.

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Facebook settled on a design in 2013 that it would stay with for the next few years.

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This is what Facebook's mobile app looked like when it first launched.

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It has since been completely redesigned.

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Facebook also owns a bunch of other popular apps, most notably Instagram, which the company bought for $1 billion in 2012. With more than 400 million monthly users, that seems like a steal nowadays.

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2015 was a big year for Facebook that saw its first ever day with one billion users online simultaneously. The company had figured out how to make money from mobile too, turning it into a $300 billion business.

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Today, more than 1.5 billion people use the social network every single month.

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And more than 1.4 billion people use it on their mobile phones every month. Not bad, considering 12 years ago smartphones didn't even exist.

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Here's the Facebook homepage today, on its 12th birthday.
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Facebook's community guidelines include a ban on revenge porn, defining it as "Images shared in revenge or without permissions from the people in the images." It's one of several major tech companies that have cracked down on the practice in recent years. The company's lawyers argued Facebook took down the photo each time it was flagged, and they're reportedly relying on a protection in European law that prevents Facebook from having to scrutinize every post that appears on a page.

According to the 14-year-old's lawyers, this is the first case of its kind in the U.K., which means there's likely little legal precedent for it. The trial is set to proceed in Belfast at a later date.

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