How hurricanes are named

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Early tropical storms were named after saints. Such as 'Santa Ana' which struck Puerto rico in 1825.

As time went on, the names came from the latitude and longitude coordinates of the storm.These coordinates were difficult to remember so in the early 1950s hurricanes adopted female names.

To avoid sexism male names have been integrated in the 1970s. Storms are given short, distinctive names to avoid confusion.Names are chosen and maintained by the World Meteorological Organization.

For Atlantic tropical storms, there are 21 alphabetical female and male names for each region. These names are recycled through every six years.

Names beginning with (Q,U,X,Y and Z) are no longer used due to limited amount of names
In the event that more than 21 named tropical cyclones occur in a season, any additional storms will take names from the Greek alphabet

If a hurricane is extremely deadly and destructive, the name will no longer be reused. the name 'Katrina' was retired after its devastating after math. There was $81 billion worth of property damages

Check out the rare photos of Hurricane Alex:

Hurricane Alex, rare January storm in the Atlantic Ocean
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Hurricane Alex, rare January storm in the Atlantic Ocean
This photo taken from video provided by NASA on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016 shows Hurricane Alex seen from the International Space Station. The rare January hurricane in the Atlantic closed in on the Azores on Friday, with authorities in the Portuguese islands warning of waves up to 18 meters (60 feet) high, wind gusts up to 160 kph (100 mph) and torrential rain. (NASA via AP)
This image was taken by GOES East at 1445Z on January 14, 2016. Alex is not just the first named storm for the 2016 calendar year. It's also the first named storm to form in the Atlantic in January since 1978, the first January-born hurricane since 1938, and just the fourth known storm to arrive in the month since records began in 1851. (Photo via NOAA)
This NOAA satellite image taken Friday, Jan. 15, 2016 at 12:45 AM EST shows a stationary front over the southern Bahamas and Cuba. Rain showers and isolated accompany this boundary as it slowly drifts to the south. The remainder of the basin is quiet with mostly sunny skies. In contrast, Hurricane Alex is over the central Atlantic Basin. Alex has maximum winds of 80 miles per hour and will affect the Azores as it moves northward. (Weather Underground via AP)
Hurricane Alex in a satellite photo released by NOAA on Jan. 14, 2016. (Photo via NOAA)
This image of Subtropical Storm Alex was taken by the Suomi NPP satellite's VIIRS instrument around 1455Z on January 13, 2016. (Photo via NOAA)
It is mid-January, and there is a hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean
Rather stunning images of Hurricane Alex passing through the Azores on this, the 15th of January.
This is #HurricaneAlex - 1938 was the last time an Atlantic hurricane formed in January. AJ
Today in doomsday signs: Hurricane Alex becomes the first January hurricane in almost 80 years:

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