Clinton's prospects in betting markets tumble on health concerns

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Online betting markets cut back Hillary Clinton's prospects of winning the Nov. 8 election after a video showed the Democratic presidential candidate stumbling and having difficulty walking as she was helped into a van at a Sept. 11 memorial, raising concerns about her health.

Her probability of victory fell 7 percentage points to 64 percent on Sunday, the biggest one-day drop since she accepted her party's nomination in late July, according to online predictions market PredictIt. Sunday's trading volume on PredictIt was also the largest in at least three months.

Moments on the trail that have sparked concern over Clinton's health

11 PHOTOS
Moments on the trail that have some concerned over Hillary Clinton's health
See Gallery
Moments on the trail that have some concerned over Hillary Clinton's health
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton stops her speech to cough at the 11th Congressional District Labor Day festival at Luke Easter Park in Cleveland, Ohio, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, has a throat lozenge during a coughing fit in the final hour of a marathon testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015, before the House Select Committee on Benghazi. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton holds up a glass of water as she struggles to contain a coughing fit as she speaks at the Jewish Federation of Greater Des Moines while campaigning in Des Moines, Iowa January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton leaves ceremonies marking the 15th anniversary of the September 11 attacks at the National 9/11 memorial The Hillary Clinton campaign disclosed she had been diagnosed with pneumonia, after a social media video appeared to show her swaying and her knees buckling as she left the memorial ceremony in New York. REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses to drink water after coughing as she speaks at the 11th Congressional District Labor Day festival at Luke Easter Park in Cleveland, Ohio, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
MANHATTAN, NEW YORK CITY, UNITED STATES - 2016/02/16: Mrs. Clinton interrupted by coughing spasm during her speech. Presidential candidate and former secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke at Shomburg Center on her plans for strengthening the Black community and improving opportunity for minorities if elected president. (Photo by Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses to drink water after coughing as she speaks at the 11th Congressional District Labor Day festival at Luke Easter Park in Cleveland, Ohio, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
CLEVELAND, OH - SEPTEMBER 05: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pauses to take a drink of water to help soothe a cough during a campaign rally at Luke Easter Park on September 5, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. Clinton is kicking off a Labor Day campaign swing to Ohio and Iowa on a new campaign plane large enough to accommodate her traveling press corp. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MAY 26: Cough drops and a microphone sit on a stool for democratic presidential candidate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a campaign event on May 26, 2016 in San Francisco, California. Hillary Clinton is campaigning in the San Francisco Bay Area ahead of California's presidential primary on June 7th. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton struggles to contain a coughing fit as she speaks at the Jewish Federation of Greater Des Moines while campaigning in Des Moines, Iowa January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

The sharpest plunge occurred immediately after the video, taken by a bystander, showed up on social media.

In a modest rebound on Monday, her prospects rose 1 percentage point on PredictIt, but trading volume was low as she canceled a planned trip to California for fundraising and other campaign events.

Her campaign disclosed that Clinton, 68, had been diagnosed with pneumonia on Friday after she complained of allergies and was seen coughing repeatedly in recent days.

The health problem was the latest blow to Clinton's White House bid at a time when Republican rival Donald Trump has erased most of her lead in national opinion polls and is competitive again in many battleground states where the election is likely to be decided.

Trump's prospects on PredictIt rose following news about Clinton's health incident, up 3 percentage points to 34 percent on Sunday, the highest end-of-the-day level since July 30.

On Monday, his probability remained unchanged despite his pledge to soon release detailed information about his health.

Paddy Power, one of Europe's biggest gambling companies, also showed Clinton's chances of winning falling to 65 percent from 73 percent in the past 24 hours.

Trump's probability of winning rose to about 40 percent from 33 percent overnight, Paddy Power said.

According to the latest polls by Reuters/Ipsos released on Saturday, Clinton had an 83 percent chance of winning the election by an average of 47 votes in the Electoral College, the body that ultimately selects the president.

Late last month, Reuters/Ipsos's States of the Nation poll estimated Clinton had a 95 percent chance of winning by an average of 108 electoral votes.

The Electoral College consists of 538 electors, apportioned by states' populations; a candidate must pick up a majority of at least 270 electoral votes to win the presidency.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners