How did newspapers cover the attacks of September 11, 2001?

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The entire world seemed to be watching as the events of September 11, 2001 unfolded -- first the attacks on the World Trade Center, then the Pentagon, then the crash of United Airlines Flight 93 in rural Pennsylvania. It was a day full of ongoing horror that was covered in the media unlike any day before it.

After the initial shock of the day's events wore off, people began demanding answers: How did this happen? How many were killed? Now what?

Click through newspaper covers from the September 11 attacks:

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Newspaper covers from the September 11 attacks
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Newspaper covers from the September 11 attacks
The Chicago Tribune and The Chicago Sun-Times both printed 'Extra' editions 11 September 2001 after the terrorist attacks on the United States. Two hijacked airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center twin towers in New York while one hijacked plane later crashed at the Pentagon office building in Washington, D.C. Another plane crashed 80 miles outside of Pittsburgh, PA. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read AFP PHOTO/AFP/Getty Images)
A man reads the ''Evening Standard'' September 13, 2001 in Green Park, London after two hijacked airplanes slammed into the World Trade Center in New York as part of a suspected terrorist attack on New York City and Washington DC September 11, 2001. (Photo by Anthony Harvey/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, UNITED STATES: US newspapers headline 12 September, 2001 the terror attacks on New York and Washington 11 September 2001. A total of four passenger jets were hijacked, with two flying into the World Trade Tower in New York and collapsing them, one flying into the Pentagon and the fourth crashed in a rural area of Pennsylvania. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 12: Terrorist attack on the United States on September 11, 2001 - FrontPages of French newspapers. (Photo by 1020/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
(Via Albuquerque Journal)
(Via Akron Beacon Journal)
(Via Seattle Post-Intelligencer)
(Via Philadelphia Inquirer)
(Photo via Detroit Free Press)
394272 02: A woman reads a copy of an evening newspaper reporting the terrorist attacks on the United States on an underground train September 11, 2001 in London. (Photo by Graham Barclay/BWP Media/Getty Images)
Front page of the Daily News dated Sept. 12, 2001, Headline: IT'S WAR, Smoke billows from north tower of the World Trade Center just an instant before the second jetliner hits the south tower during terrorist attack., (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
394319 03: The front page of the Chicago Sun-Times with a headline that reads 'OUTRAGE' regarding the terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center is displayed September, 12, 2001 in Chicago. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Getty Images)
Newspaper vendor Carlos Mercado sells the 'Extra' editon of the Chicago Sun-Times printed 11 September, 2001, after the terrorist attacks on the United States. Two hijacked airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center twin towers in New York while one hijacked plane later crashed at the Pentagon in Washington, DC, with another plane crashing 80 miles outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. AFP PHOTO/Scott OLSON (Photo credit should read SCOTT OLSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Front pages of the British national newspapers are seen Wednesday, September 12, 2001. Photos and stories of the attacks in New York and Washington dominated the front pages. (AP Photo/Martin Cleaver)

Muslim spritual leader of a Brasilia mosque Nasser Aboujokh reads a newspaper 12 September, 2001, with the headline 'Fear' as it reports on the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, DC, 11 September. (Photo credit EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)

Newspapers Depicting The 9/11 Bombings In New York. (Photo by Photoshot/Getty Images)
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Newspapers around the country and world took on the job of trying to make some sense of the attacks. Images of the burning twin towers were plastered on newsstands everywhere, below passionate headlines of 'Outrage,' 'Terror!' and 'It's War.'

Few questions were answered immediately -- one British newspaper wrote that 20,000 were feared dead, and though many were quick to point to terrorism, Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda didn't claim responsibility for the attacks until several years later.

In the days and weeks following the attacks, information became clearer and more readily available. Now, 15 years later, that fateful Tuesday seems like ages ago for some, but like yesterday for others. Click through the slideshow above to look back on how the events of 9/11 were covered worldwide.

SEE MORE: Commemoration events begin in New York City:

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