The effect on airport security after 9/11

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Air travel during the 1950s was deemed the Golden Age -- travel was glorious and security was hassle free.

Airport security has changed drastically since the terror attacks of September 11, 2001.

The attacks resulted in the creation of the Transportation Security Administration to prevent similar attacks in the future.

SEE ALSO: 4 US airports to open automated security lanes this fall

The first security screening stations were put in place in the 1960's -- after a flight from the U.S. to Cuba was hijacked by a man carrying a knife and a gun.

The FAA allowed passengers to carry blades less than 4 inches -- those items have since been prohibited entirely.

You may feel inconvenienced or grossed out taking off your shoes when going through airport security.

This started after convicted terrorist Richard Reid unsuccessfully attempted to detonate an explosive in his shoes back in 2001.

Prior to 9/11 families would be allowed at the gate to greet their loved ones or say goodbye. Today, you cannot go through security without a boarding pass and loved ones can meet you curbside.

According to TSA you are allowed a quart-sized bag of 3.4 ounce liquid containers. This was instated after an al-Qaeda threat over undetectable liquid explosives.

Does airport security during a post-9/11 era make you feel anxious or safe?

Click through the gallery to see images from airport security job training:

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A look inside airport security job training
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A look inside airport security job training
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, a Transportation Security Administration officer candidate passes through a body scanner as she plays the part of an air traveler during a training session in an airport security checkpoint simulator at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Hans Phifer works with Rufus, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift luggage area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
This Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo shows an etching of a bomb-sniffing dog on the glass door at the entrance to the Transportation Security Administration canine training facilityat Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, searches a mail cart in a makeshift warehouse during a Transportation Security Administration training drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration instructor Larry Colburn covers his ears as he prepares to set off an explosive device during a lecture to airport security officer candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, a Transportation Security Administration instructor watches candidates train on a baggage X-ray machine during a training session in an airport security checkpoint simulator at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Tref, a bomb-sniffing dog, goes through drills in a makeshift airport at a Transportation Security Administration training facility at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration officer candidates practice pat-down techniques during a training session in airport security checkpoint procedures at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Ford Rinewalt works with Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
This Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo shows explosive compounds on display for Transportation Security Administration candidates during an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration airport security officer candidates listen during an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
This Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, shows an explosive trigger on display for Transportation Security Administration candidates during an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Melissa Ellis works with Toska, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Mitchell Brown works with Atilla, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift luggage area at Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Bella, a bomb-sniffing dog, wears a "Do Not Pet" harness as she goes through drills in a makeshift airport during drills at Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Mitchell Brown works with Atilla, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift luggage area at Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration trainer Anthony Martinez works with Bella, a bomb-sniffing dog, during drills in a makeshift airport at a Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Anthony Martinez works with Bella, a bomb-sniffing dog, during drills in a makeshift airport at a Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Ford Rinewalt works with Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Melissa Ellis works with Toska, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Atilla, a bomb-sniffing dog, is rewarded with a tennis ball as she trains with Transportation Security Administration's Mitchell Brown in a makeshift luggage area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Melissa Ellis works with Toska, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Melissa Ellis works with Toska, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Ford Rinewalt works with Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Hans Phifer works with Rufus, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift luggage area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Ford Rinewalt works with Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and stung by a report showing banned items slipping through security, the TSA is training new agents and canine teams to do a better job.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration officer candidate Mark Holm role plays as a passenger during a training session in an airport security checkpoint simulator at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration instructor Larry Colburn gives an explosives lecture to airport security officer candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, a Transportation Security Administration instructor holds an explosives trigger during an explosives lecture to airport security officer candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration officer candidate Shasta Terry gets help from instructor Frank Crane as she learns to scan bags during an airport security training session at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration officer candidate Crystal Champagne scans baggage during a training session in an airport security checkpoint simulator at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration security officer candidates attend an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration airport security officer candidates listen during an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration security officer candidates cover their ears as an explosive device is detonated on a bomb range during an explosives demonstration at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, an explosive device is detonated on a bomb range during an explosives demonstration for Transportation Security Administration candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, a Transportation Security Administration candidate learns to operate a body scanner during a training session at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration instructor Larry Colburn gives an explosives lecture to airport security candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, a bomb is detonated on a range during an explosives demonstration for Transportation Security Administration officer candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
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