Greenland's ice is melting and here's why you should care

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Greenland's ice is melting.

Global warming is having an adverse effect on Greenland's ice sheet.

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The sheet currently covers most of the island and is three times the size of Texas, but it's shrinking.

From 1979 to 2006, the summer heat has increased the amount of melting ice by 30 percent.

And while the winter snow used to offset the loss of ice, scientists say warmer temperatures are causing the island's ice to melt at a faster rate.

If the Earth's temperature increases by two degrees Celsius, it would result in the total loss of Greenland's ice sheet.

This poses serious problems because of the runoff of freshwater from the ice sheet.

If Greenland's ice sheet were to melt entirely the sea level would rise more than 20 feet.

Combined with the arctic's ice caps melting, scientists predict the rise in sea level would affect almost every major coast city in the world.

The influx of freshwater won't just affect coastlines, it will disrupt ocean circulation and habitat's climates.

To put it in perspective - last century Greenland lost 90 billion tons of ice a year. That has now increased to 269 billion tons a year.

RELATED: See more photos of Greenland's melting ice sheet

22 PHOTOS
Greenland's melting ice
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Greenland's melting ice
Children play amid icebergs on the beach in Nuuk, Greenland, June 5, 2016. REUTERS/Alister Doyle TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Wildflowers bloom on a hill overlooking the Narsarsuaq glacier in southern Greenland July 25, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
An iceberg floats near a harbour in the town of Kulusuk, east Greenland August 1, 2009. Picture taken August 1. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND TRAVEL ENVIRONMENT)
Icebergs float in the calm waters of a fjord, south of Tasiilaq in eastern Greenland August 4, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT)
Icebergs float in a fjord near the south Greenland town of Narsaq July 28, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A field of wildflowers blooms on a hill outside in Tasiilaq August 4, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND)
Clothes hang out to dry in the town of Ilulissat in western Greenland in this photo taken May 14, 2007. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND)
Picture shows a fjord behind the town of Ilulissat in Greenland August 16, 2007, during the visit of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Environment Minister Sigmar Gabriel to the region. Merkel and Gabriel are on a two day visit to Greenland to get information on consequences of global warming. REUTERS/Michael Kappeler/Pool (GREENLAND)
Houses are illuminated by the early morning sun in the town of Tasiilaq in eastern Greenland August 4, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT)
The Greenland ice cap is formed into mounds and ridges near the town of Kulusuk August 2, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT)
A large iceberg floats in Eriks Fjord near the town of Narsarsuaq in southern Greenland July 26, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
A colony of Black-legged Kittiwake seagulls tend to their chicks on a cliff near the south Greenland town of Narsaq July 28, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT)
Wildflowers bloom on a hill overlooking a fjord filled with icebergs near the south Greenland town of Narsaq July 27, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A large iceberg floats in Eriks Fjord near the town of Narsarsuaq in southern Greenland July 26, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Kulusuk in eastern Greenland August 2, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT)
A large iceberg melts into jagged edges as it floats in Eriks Fjord near the town of Narsarsuaq in southern Greenland July 26, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
Houses are painted in bright colors in the town of Ilulissat in western Greenland as seen in this photo taken May 15, 2007. REUTERS/BOB STRONG (GREENLAND) Also see image: GF1DVYVPIWAA
Icebergs are reflected in the waters of Eriks Fjord near the town of Narsarsuaq in southern Greenland July 26, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
An iceberg is pictured in Ilulissat fjord in Greenland August 16, 2007, during the visit of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Environment Minister Sigmar Gabriel to the region. Merkel and Gabriel are on a two day visit to Greenland to get information on consequences of global warming. REUTERS/Michael Kappeler/Pool (GREENLAND)
A whale dives into sea off the coast of Greenland's capital Nuuk October 17, 2012. By a remote fjord where icebergs float in silence and hunters stalk reindeer, plans are being drawn up for a huge iron ore mine that would lift Greenland's population by four percent at a stroke - by hiring Chinese workers. The $2.3-billion project by the small, British company London Mining Plc would also bring diesel power plants, a road and a port near Greenland's capital Nuuk. It would supply China with much needed iron for the steel its economy. With global warming thawing its Arctic sea lanes, and global industry eyeing minerals under this barren island a quarter the size of the United States, the 57,000 Greenlanders are wrestling with opportunities that offer rich rewards but risk harming a pristine environment and a traditional society that is trying to make its own way in the world after centuries of European rule. Yet a scramble for Greenland already may be under way, in which some see China trying to exploit the icebound territory as a staging ground in a global battle for Arctic resources and strategic control of new shipping routes. Picture taken October 17, 2012. To match Insight GREENLAND/ REUTERS/Alistair Scrutton (GREENLAND - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
Icebergs are reflected in the calm waters at the mouth of the Jakobshavn ice fjord near Ilulissat in Greenland in this photo taken May 15, 2007. New York, Boston and other cities on North America's northeast coast could face a rise in sea level this century that would exceed forecasts for the rest of the planet if Greenland's ice sheet keeps melting as fast as it is now, researchers said May 27, 2009. Sea levels off the northeast coast of North America could rise by 12 to 20 inches more than other coastal areas if the Greenland glacier-melt continues to accelerate at its present pace, the researchers reported. REUTERS/Bob Strong/Files (GREENLAND ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
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