Father warns others after baby daughter nearly choked to death on expired snack

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After Canadian dad Justin Morrice's little girl nearly died in his arms, he took to social media to spread a dire warning about baby food labels.

Morrice posted on Facebook following a harrowing moment when his 10-month-old daughter, Annabelle, began choking on August 21 while eating a Gerber Lil' Crunchies snack. They're meant for children who have started to crawl.

But although Annabelle had eaten these particular snacks before, the problem with the batch that caused her to choke on them was hidden within the package's fine print.

"As I sit here still shaking I'm posting this as a reminder to ALL parents of small children..." he began. "Please always read labels on the foods we feed them."


"She was trying to cry but no sound was coming out," the father wrote in his terrifying post, which has now been shared over 47,000 times.

After a few attempts at CPR, he was finally able to dislodge the snack with his finger, only to hear the sweetest sound after such a scary minute-long ordeal -- his daughter crying.

After calming down, Morrice noticed a warning written in tiny letters on the snack container, directing parents to "throw contents out after 5 days of breaking the seal."

Gerber's website says the snack's "easily dissolving texture is great for your new self-feeder."

However, Morrice thinks the dissolving quality diminished after the recommended five days.

"I opened a new container and I could not believe the difference," Morrice described. "The ones in the can she choked on I can only describe to be like a foam ear plug. I could squish it but it would expand back out and would not break apart. The ones in the new can crumbled with ease."

In a statement to The Huffington Post, Gerber responded to Morrice's post, emphasizing the importance of supervising children while eating and reading product labels.

"As part of our process to continually improve, we consider consumer input when we design our products, labels and educational materials," the statement read. "We will include this feedback into that ongoing process."

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