Poll: Hillary Clinton still has advantage over Donald Trump

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Poll: Clinton Still Has Advantage Over Trump

With just weeks to go until election day, the race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump seems to be getting tighter and tighter.

But according to a new 50-state poll from The Washington Post and SurveyMonkey, Clinton still has some big advantages over her opponent.

Related: Notable Republicans who support Hillary Clinton

Notable Republicans who support Hillary Clinton
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Notable Republicans who support Hillary Clinton
Joint Economic Committee members Rep. Richard Hanna listens to Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke (foreground) at the Joint Economic Committee hearings in Washington May 22, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Cameron/File Photo
Henry 'Hank' Paulson, chairman and founder of the Paulson Institute and former U.S. Treasury secretary, gestures as he speaks during a Bloomberg Television interview in London, U.K., on Monday, May 11, 2015. 'For the U.K. to be economically relevant by far the best case is to be an economic leader in one of the biggest economic blocs in the world,' Paulson said. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images **
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, accompanied by former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, left, attends a National Security working session at the Historical Society Library in New York, Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 31: Former United States Secretary of Commerce and CEO of the Kellogg Company, Carlos Gutierrez poses for a portrait at the Capital Hilton on Thursday January 31, 2013 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt McClain for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
INSA Chairman of the Board John Negroponte speaks during the inaugural Intelligence Community Summit organized by the Intelligence and National Security Alliance (INSA) on September 12, 2013 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Richard Armitage, former US Deputy Secretary of State, listens as Admiral Katsutoshi Kawano, Japan's chief of staff of the Joint Staff Council and Self-Defense Forces, speak at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC on July 16, 2015. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Former National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft listens during a forum discussion at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies on October 22, 2013 in Washington. Former US government officials and academics joined to speak about the current meaning of national security. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Gov. Arne Carlson discusses his tuition voucher plan at an inner-city charter school called City Academy in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1995. The plan would allow low-income families to receive between $500 and $3,000 in state aid to send their children to private schools. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)

The Post and SurveyMonkey polled more than 74,000 registered voters between Aug. 9 and Sept. 1.

And they found a big weakness in Trump's campaign — a low number of college-educated, white voters, especially women.

See, in recent elections, white college grads have voted Republican for the most part.

But the poll found Trump is trailing Clinton in this area across the country, even in some very red states.

More from Newsy: An Honest Conversation About National Polls And Predicting Elections

According to the survey, Trump is struggling in several places, including Texas, Georgia and Arizona, even though Republicans have consistently won in those areas in the past.

And if he wants to win the election, he's going to have to win those states.

Still, the gap between Trump and Clinton has been getting smaller.

A new CNN poll out Tuesday suggests Trump has pulled ahead of Clinton by a mere 2 percentage points among likely voters.

But depending on which polls you look at, Clinton seems to be leading in a few key battleground states, like Pennsylvania.

And as CBS notes, Trump really needs to win those states "given his current electoral map."

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