British government to set out plans on post-Brexit ties with EU in coming week

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Theresa May Steps On To The World Stage In China

LONDON, Sept 4 (Reuters) - The British government will set out in the coming week how it plans to shape its relationship with the European Union upon leaving the bloc, Prime Minister Theresa May said in an interview broadcast on Sunday.

Since taking office in July, May and her Brexit minister David Davis have given little detail about what Britain's future relationship with the EU will look like, saying only they want it to involve curbs on immigration and a good deal on trade.

"He (Davis) will be making a statement to parliament this week about the work that the government has been doing over the summer and obviously how we are going to take that forward in shaping the sort of relationship we want with the EU," May told the BBC in an interview recorded before she left Britain for the G20 summit in China.

On her way to the summit, May told reporters Britain's economy will suffer as a result of the decision to leave the EU despite signs in recent economic data that the impact has not been as severe as some predicted.

Related: May and more world leaders arrive for the G20 summit:

19 PHOTOS
G20 Summit 2016 in China, leaders arrive
See Gallery
G20 Summit 2016 in China, leaders arrive
U.S. President Barack Obama arrives at Hangzhou Xiaoshan international airport before the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China September 3, 2016. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
British Prime Minister Theresa May arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (R), his wife Sophie Gregoire and their daughter Ella-Grace arrive at the Hangzhou Xiaoshan international airport before the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 3, 2016. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
Saudi Arabia Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (C) arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
South Korean President Park Geun-Hye arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
Russian President Vladimir Putin arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
French President Francois Hollande arrives at Hangzhou Xiaoshan international airport before the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Chance Chan
Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi steps out of the plane as he arrives at the Hangzhou Xiaoshan international airport before the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China September 3, 2016. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan (R) arrives at the Hangzhou Exhibition Center to participate to G20 Summit, in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Etienne Oliveau/Pool
Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto arrives at the Hangzhou Exhibition Center to participate to G20 Summit, in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex Dela Pena/Pool
Brazilian President Michel Temer (C) arrives arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
Indonesian President Joko Widodo arrives to attend the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, September 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rolex dela Pena/Pool
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

May told the BBC she would use the summit to begin talks with world leaders including U.S. President Barack Obama, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull over future trade deals.

"I want to talk about how we can scope out what a trade deal and the negotiations on a trade deal would be like so that when the time comes, when we are able to sign those deals, we are able to do so," she said.

May, who upset Chinese officials by delaying a $24 billion project to build a partly Chinese-funded nuclear power plant, is also due to hold a one-to-one with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the summit. She told the BBC she would be making a decision on the deal later this month.

May has been clear she will not trigger Article 50, the formal process of leaving the EU, this year in order to give Britain time to prepare for upcoming negotiations, but said it would not be "kicked into the long grass."

May said there would be no early national election, despite some in her ruling Conservatives believing turmoil in the opposition Labour Party gives them an opportunity to increase their small parliamentary majority.

"We need that period of time, that stability to be able to deal with the issues that the country is facing and have that election in 2020," she said.

She also dismissed comments by Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon that the Brexit vote had shifted the debate on Scottish independence just two years after Scots voted by 10 percentage points to reject it. Opinions polls did not suggest the Scottish people want another vote, May said.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners