This solar-powered pack will light your way to safety

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This solar-powered pack will light your way to safety

Light the path of your next adventure with the LuminAID.

You can take the portable and waterproof light with you hiking and swimming,

A Few hours of charging in the sun can provide up to 8 hrs of LED light.

The LuminAID was originally created to help victims of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Its makers wanted to create a portable light that could help families during power outages.

You can easily customize the amount of light that shines. Press once for a dim light and twice for a bright lighting

You can give a helping hand from across the world, by purchasing this light, you can donate to the 'Give light, Get light' initiative. Not only do you get a LuminAID, but a family in need in over 70 countries will receive one too.

For less than $20, you can take the LuminAID on your next hiking trip, or store it in case of any emergencies to light your way back to safety.

Learn more about the devastating earthquake that hit Haiti leaving millions malnourished:

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Haiti drought and malnutrition
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Haiti drought and malnutrition
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, Carole Joseph holds her toddler twins, Angelo, left, and Angela, after visiting a local health center to examine her children for signs of malnutrition, in Oriani, Haiti. The 28-year-old mother of four, is among roughly 1.5 million Haitians who can't get nearly enough nutrition because of a yearslong drought that has spoiled harvests in her small mountain village and across large sections of the countryside. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, a man waters his onion garden in Fonds Verrettes, Haiti. For the last three years, a punishing drought has driven Haitians who were already barely getting by on marginal farmland even deeper into misery. Officials say more rural families are being forced to join the decades-long exodus to cities. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, vendors cull through bunches of carrots, to sell at a local street market in Oriani, Haiti. A drought worsened by the El Nino weather phenomenon has driven Haitians who were already barely getting by on marginal farmland deeper into misery. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, Angelo, left and his twin sister Angela, crawl on the earthen floor of their front porch in Oriani, Haiti. A drought worsened by the El Nino weather phenomenon has driven Haitians who were already barely getting by on marginal farmland deeper into misery. Only shriveled carrots and potatoes grow in their mother's small vegetable plot. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, community health volunteer Sylvio Fils-Aime examines a child for signs of malnutrition, in Oriani, Haiti. For the last three years, a punishing drought has driven Haitians who were already barely getting by on marginal farmland even deeper into misery. Diminishing calories means more children are vulnerable to infections like measles and any number of other diseases. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, a man pours water he collected from a nearby river, pictured in background, into a larger receptacle, in Fonds Verrettes, Haiti. For the last three years, a punishing drought has driven Haitians who were already barely getting by on marginal farmland even deeper into misery. Last year's crop yields were the worst in 35 years in a country where more than two-thirds of people eke out a living from agriculture, many using archaic hand tools. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, community health volunteer Sylvio Fils-Aime examines a child for signs of malnutrition, in Oriani, Haiti. Many Haitians routinely go to bed hungry. But the impact of a yearlong drought is so severe that Haiti is facing "unprecedented food insecurity," according to the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, residents carry buckets filled with water they collected from the Soliette river, to irrigate their vegetable plots, in Fonds Verrettes, Haiti. Economist Kesner Pharel says local agricultural production has contracted so severely over the last two years that 70 percent of the crops consumed in Haiti are now imported, up from roughly 50 percent in the past. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 20, 2016 photo, a boat sits near Lake Azuei in Thomazeau, Haiti. ( AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
This Feb. 20, 2016 photo shows the dry, cracked lakebed of Trou Caiman, in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. A drought worsened by the El Nino weather phenomenon has driven Haitians who were already barely getting by on marginal farmland deeper into misery. An estimated 1.5 million people are going hungry as crop yields fall to lowest levels in 35 years in a country where two-thirds of people eke out a living from agriculture. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
This Feb. 20, 2016 photo shows the dry, cracked lakebed of Trou Caiman, in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti. A drought worsened by the El Nino weather phenomenon has driven Haitians who were already barely getting by on marginal farmland deeper into misery. An estimated 1.5 million people are going hungry as crop yields fall to lowest levels in 35 years in a country where two-thirds of people eke out a living from agriculture. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 20, 2016 photo, residents siphon water from a waterhole in the lakebed of Lastique lake, in Fonds Parisiens, Haiti. For the last three years, a punishing drought has driven Haitians who were already barely getting by on marginal farmland even deeper into misery. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
In this Feb. 15, 2016 photo, Roodymanche Lomane plants potatoes in his small vegetable plot, in Oriani, Haiti. A strong El Nino weather phenomenon that's been disrupting weather patterns across the globe, is leaving many places in Latin America and the Caribbean stricken by drought. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
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