This rainforest is full of tiny, miniature creatures

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This rainforest is full of tiny, miniature creatures

Everyone loves mini pigs, but did you know there is a rainforest in South America full of miniature creatures?

The Valdivian rainforest region in Southern Chile and parts of Argentina is one of the only temperate forests on the continent.

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And unlike the Amazon where everything is larger than life, these forests offer sanctuary to a group of smaller animals.

The Kodkod is the smallest cat in the Americas, weighing only about 5 lbs.

The nocturnal feline has been listed as threatened because people keep clearing away the rainforests for lumber.

You can also find the world's smallest deer in the same forest.

The Pudu are less than 20 inches in height and weight up to 26 lbs. Baby Pudus are no bigger than the size of a kitten.

Just like the Kodkod, the Pudu is also listed as threatened because of the destruction of the forest.

Another tiny friend found in the Valdivian rainforest is the Monito del Monte.

This tiny opossum weighs less than a pound and lives in the thickets of bamboo within the forests.

Scientists think it's related to Australian marsupials because South America and Australia used to be connected through Antarctica.

Just goes to show that sometimes less is definitely more -- cute that is.

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