New images show devastating impact of Zika on babies' brains

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

New Images Show Devastating Impact Of Zika On Babies' Brains

A report has been released by an international team of researchers about the dangerous effects of the Zika virus on fetuses and infants based on new imaging findings.

As Fernanda Tovar-Moll, the lead author, has stated in a news release issued by Radiological Society of North America, "Imaging is essential for identifying the presence and the severity of the structural changes induced by the infection, especially in the central nervous system."

SEE ALSO: Calcium supplements linked to higher dementia rates

For the research, the team analyzed the brain scans of about 45 fetuses and newborns linked to Zika; they were all reported in Brazil which is considered to be the epicenter of the current outbreak.

The scientists found that the babies had a number of brain defects other than microcephaly where the head is abnormally small.

These other problems included abnormalities in a part of the brain that enables communication between the two hemispheres and another that hinders neurons from arriving at the proper location.

RELATED: See alternative therapies for Zika babies

9 PHOTOS
Alternative therapies for Zika babies
See Gallery
Alternative therapies for Zika babies
Therapist Rozely Fontoura holds Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil March 26, 2016. When Daniele Santos gave birth to a baby boy with microcephaly, a serious birth defect linked to the Zika infection, she was distraught. She was left to look after Juan Pedro alone after her husband left. In addition to traditional treatment at a hospital in Recife, Santos is learning therapeutic massage from an NGO to help alleviate Pedro's symptoms. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "PEDRO PAULO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Daniele Santos (R) holds her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, with therapist Rozely Fontoura in her home in Recife, Brazil March 26, 2016. When Santos gave birth to a baby boy with microcephaly, a serious birth defect linked to the Zika infection, she was distraught. She was left to look after Juan Pedro alone after her husband left. In addition to traditional treatment at a hospital in Recife, Santos is learning therapeutic massage from an NGO to help alleviate Pedro's symptoms. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "PEDRO PAULO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Daniele Santos is reflected in a mirror while she jokes with her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil March 26, 2016. When Santos gave birth to a baby boy with microcephaly, a serious birth defect linked to the Zika infection, she was distraught. She was left to look after Juan Pedro alone after her husband left. In addition to traditional treatment at a hospital in Recife, Santos is learning therapeutic massage from an NGO to help alleviate Pedro's symptoms. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "PEDRO PAULO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Daniele Santos (L) holds her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, as she talks with therapist Rozely Fontoura in front of her house, in Recife, Brazil March 26, 2016. When Santos gave birth to a baby boy with microcephaly, a serious birth defect linked to the Zika infection, she was distraught. She was left to look after Juan Pedro alone after her husband left. In addition to traditional treatment at a hospital in Recife, Santos is learning therapeutic massage from an NGO to help alleviate Pedro's symptoms. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "PEDRO PAULO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Therapist Rozely Fontoura (L) teaches Daniele Santos Shantala massage on her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil March 26, 2016. When Santos gave birth to a baby boy with microcephaly, a serious birth defect linked to the Zika infection, she was distraught. She was left to look after Juan Pedro alone after her husband left. In addition to traditional treatment at a hospital in Recife, Santos is learning therapeutic massage from an NGO to help alleviate Pedro's symptoms. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "PEDRO PAULO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Therapist Rozely Fontoura (R) teaches Daniele Santos to put her baby Juan Pedro in a sling in her home in Recife, Brazil March 26, 2016. When Santos gave birth to a baby boy with microcephaly, a serious birth defect linked to the Zika infection, she was distraught. She was left to look after Juan Pedro alone after her husband left. In addition to traditional treatment at a hospital in Recife, Santos is learning therapeutic massage from an NGO to help alleviate Pedro's symptoms. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "PEDRO PAULO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Daniele Santos holds her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, while washing dishes in her home in Recife, Brazil March 26, 2016. When Santos gave birth to a baby boy with microcephaly, a serious birth defect linked to the Zika infection, she was distraught. She was left to look after Juan Pedro alone after her husband left. In addition to traditional treatment at a hospital in Recife, Santos is learning therapeutic massage from an NGO to help alleviate Pedro's symptoms. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "PEDRO PAULO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Therapist Rozely Fontoura (L) teaches Daniele Santos Shantala massage on her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil March 26, 2016. When Santos gave birth to a baby boy with microcephaly, a serious birth defect linked to the Zika infection, she was distraught. She was left to look after Juan Pedro alone after her husband left. In addition to traditional treatment at a hospital in Recife, Santos is learning therapeutic massage from an NGO to help alleviate Pedro's symptoms. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "PEDRO PAULO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

The newborns also commonly had a condition where the brain's fluid-filled structures were too large while the overall tissue volume was low.

As such, pregnant women are advised to avoid affected areas especially during the first trimester when the virus is considered the most dangerous for the fetus.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners