These foods could keep you sniffle-free during cold and flu season

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By TC Newman, Buzz60

No one has the time to stop their lives to nurse a cold, but adding or increasing the intake of certain foods can help keep one healthy during cold and flu season.

You probably won't be kissing anyone while you're sick anyway, so why not get the health benefits of garlic? Known for its antimicrobial and antibacterial properties, studies show garlic and garlic supplements can help stop a cold before it even starts.

See more on the flu:

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How the flu vaccine is made
Quality control manager Nina Kotlyarova prepares to check samples for unwanted bacteria as part of the process for making an influenza vaccine at Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. After a limited distribution last season, Protein Sciences Corporation expects to ship 1 million doses of Flublok for this coming flu season. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A bioreactor stands in the production facilities of Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on a greater variety of vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Quality control manager Nina Kotlyarova prepares to check samples for unwanted bacteria as part of the process for making an influenza vaccine at Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on additional vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Protein Sciences CEO Manon Cox speaks to a reporter in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on more vaccine options for the coming flu season. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A bioreactor, left, stands in the production facilities of Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on addational vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
In this Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 photo, slides of human cells that have been exposed to the flu virus and dyed to bring out the cells fighting the virus are shown on a holder, at the Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health's laboratory, in Seattle. State health officials say state labs have confirmed at least 120 flu deaths since the season started in September, but only a fraction of those who die from the flu are tested for the virus. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 photo, Paul Swenson, director of the Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health's laboratory, works under the protective glass of a biological safety cabinet as he exposes human cells to a suspected flu virus taken with a swab from the throat of a sick person, in Seattle. State health officials say state labs have confirmed at least 120 flu deaths since the season started in September, but only a fraction of those who die from the flu are tested for the virus. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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The quintessential fall favorite, pumpkin, is a great source of beta-carotene, a phytochemical that the human body turns into essential Vitamin A. And no, your pumpkin spiced latte isn't going to cut it. Other orange foods, like sweet potatoes and carrots pack a beta-carotene punch as well.

Fish, especially salmon, tuna and mackerel, are rich in Vitamin D. This vital element often goes missing during cold and flu season because we aren't getting as much sun.

The Vitamin C in citrus fruits can ward off colds, but don't limit yourself to orange juice. High amounts of vitamin C can be found in red peppers, strawberries and kiwi.

Try these slight changes to your diet and you could be sniffle free all season long!

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