Twins born overnight on Daylight Savings are both older

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It's likely that Daylight Savings results in some confusion. Whether you're more tired, show up somewhere early or late, or are hungry earlier than usual, it may take a few days to get used to. For one family, however, the impact of Daylight Savings may last forever.

Twins Samuel and Ronan Peterson were born in Cape Cod Hospital on November 6. Mother Emily gave birth to Samuel first, but Ronan is technically older.

How did this happen? Samuel was born at 1:39am on Sunday; by the time Ronan was born 31 minutes later, the time had moved back so he was born at 1:09am.

RELATED: Check out interesting daylight savings time facts

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Benjamin Franklin essentially came up with this glorious time exchange in 1741, when he was an ambassador for Paris.Though it wasn't until World War I that Europe truly started to implement Daylight Saving Time in order to bolster their war efforts.

DST before 2007 used to fall a few days before Halloween, but since the holiday tends to come with increased accidents it was moved to the first Sunday in November, according to Acurite.

Though, some dispute that the change was made to allow Trick or Treaters to stay out longer. 

Circa 1955: Silhouette of a witch on a broomstick flying over the skyline of New York City, Halloween.

(Photo by Lambert/Getty Images)

Arizona and Hawaii are the only two U.S. states that don't observe Daylight Saving Time. Pro: they don't have to worry about changing their clocks. Con: they never 'gain an hour.'

When World War II came around-- saving time was fashionable again and everyone wanted to get their hands on daylight saving time. However, it was near complete confusion in the United States-- there was no uniformity. According to Live Science, "One 35-mile bus ride from Moundsville, W.Va., to Steubenville, Ohio, took riders through no less than seven different time changes."

It was officially adopted by the U.S. in 1966. 

DST can affect the time you're born-- on paper that is. A baby could be born at 1:55 a.m. during daylight saving time, with another born ten minutes later, marked as 1:05 a.m.

Freaky, huh?

We hate to be that person-- but Daylight Saving Time is not plural, though many say and spell it as such. So, if you want to be that person you can spend the day correcting all of your friends when they say "daylight savings time."
Many countries near the equator do not adjust their clocks for daylight saving. Japan and China don't observe DST at all, and Antarctica doesn't either.
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"I said earlier that night that they were either going to be born on two different days or the time change was going to come into play," father Seth Peterson told local news outlet WCVB.

WCVB reported that this was first time maternity nurse Deb Totten saw a birth like this in her 40 years on the job.

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