The powerful reason why women are wearing white as they vote for Hillary Clinton

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In a matter of hours, Hillary Clinton could make history as the first female U.S. president. And to mark that occasion, women across the country are making a subtle nod to the suffragettes and members of the women's movement by showing up to vote wearing white, even starting a hashtag to celebrate the momentous occasion: #WearWhiteToVote.

The color white was one of the signature colors worn by suffragettes, starting in the early 20th century as a way to unify participants during a rally in London's Hyde Park.

So now, while women in America cast their votes in an election that could put the first women in the White House, they're paying homage to the women who first fought for their right to vote more than 100 years ago.

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White has played a unique part of Clinton's campaign specifically, with the former secretary of state wearing a white pantsuit as she accepted the nomination at the Democratic National Convention in July.

PHOTOS: Hillary Clinton wearing white at the DNC

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Hillary Clinton DNC speech
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton bats balloons after accepting the nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton enjoys the balloon drop after accepting the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her husband former president Bill Clinton react to the balloon drop after she accepted the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton enjoys the balloon drop with her vice presidential running mate Senator Tim Kaine after accepting the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her husband former president Bill Clinton react to the balloon drop after she accepted the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton celebrates with balloons after she accepted the nomination on the last night of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton celebrates among balloons after she accepted the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her vice presidential running mate Senator Tim Kaine celebrate among balloons after she accepted the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton hugs her husband former president Bill Clinton after accepting the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton bats balloons after accepting the nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (L) waves with Anne Holton, wife of vice presidential running mate Senator Tim Kaine (Back, R) and her husband former president Bill Clinton after accepting the nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton walks with her vice presidential running mate Senator Tim Kaine during the balloon drop after accepting the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (L) and Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Tim Kaine (R) celebrate with loved ones and supporters after her acceptance speech at the 2016 Democratic National Convention July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and her husband former US President Bill Clinton watch falling balloons during the 2016 Democratic National Convention July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton stands with her husband, former president Bill Clinton, after accepting the nomination on the final night of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Balloons come down on Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine at the end of the fourth and final night of the Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Center on July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton celebrates among balloons after she accepted the nomination on the fourth and final night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 28, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton celebrates at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on the final night of the Democratic National Convention, July 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Chelsea Clinton and Hillary Clinton pictured at The 2016 Democratic National Convention day 4 at The Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 28, 2016. Credit: Star Shooter/MediaPunch/IPX
UNITED STATES - JULY 28: Hillary Clinton reacts to the pyrotechnics display as Bill Clinton joins her on stage after her acceptance speech for the nomination to be President at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 28: Bill Clinton hugs Hillary Clinton after her acceptance speech for the nomination to be President at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 28: Democratic nominees for President and Vice President Hillary Clinton and Sen. Time Kaine on stage at the end of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. Hillary Clinton became the first woman to win the nomination of a major political party for President of the United States. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 28: Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton arrives to address the crowd at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pa., on the final night of the Democratic National Convention, July 28, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
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At the time, people immediately saw meaning in her stark-white attire.

Female candidates before Clinton too have used white to make a nod to the past.

In 1968, when Shirley Chisholm became the first-ever African-American woman elected to Congress, she wore white. And in 1984, as Geraldine Ferraro made history as the first woman to ever accept the vice presidential nomination for a major party, she wore white.

The powerful reason why women are wearing white as they vote for Hillary Clinton
Shirley Chisholm in 1969 and Geraldine Ferraro in 1984
Source: AP Images/YouTube

So now, women are continuing the trend, following in the footsteps of the history-making women before them, by casting their votes for a female president while wearing a signature color in feminist history.

If only all the women who fought for this precise moment could see them now.

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