Can too much Halloween candy kill you?

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Don't be fooled by the nice wrapping. Candy can kill you -- but it'll take a lot.

With Americans spending $2.7 billion on Halloween candy this year, the American Chemical Society figured out that if a person consumes 13.5 grams per pound of his or her body weight all at once, half of their test group would die of a sugar overdose.

SEE ALSO: What your taste in candy says about you

The test was run on rat labs, and the chances of death by consuming that much candy would be 50/50.

RELATED: What is the most popular candy in your state?

52 PHOTOS
Most popular Halloween candy in each state
See Gallery
Most popular Halloween candy in each state

Alabama: Airheads

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Alaska: Snickers

Photo: Shutterstock

Source: Influenster

Arizona: Toblerone

Photo: Ben Gabbe via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Arkansas: Skittles

Photo: Cassandra Hubbart, AOL

Source: Influenster

California: Lifesavers

Photo: Tim Boyle via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Colorado: Milky Way

Photo: Cassandra Hubbart, AOL

Source: Influenster

Connecticut: Reese's Peanut Butter Cups

Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Delaware: 3 Musketeers

Photo: Myra Iqbal, AOL

Source: Influenster

Florida: Nestlé Crunch Bar

Photo: AP

Source: Influenster

Georgia: Pixy Stix

Photo: Jennifer Smith via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Hawaii: 100 Grand Bar

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Idaho: Butterfinger

Photo: Mark Lennihan/AP

Source: Influenster

Illinois: Snickers

Photo: Shutterstock

Source: Influenster

Indiana: Reese's Pieces

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Iowa: Twix

Photo: ullstein bild via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Kansas: Twizzlers

Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Kentucky: Whoppers

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Louisiana: Swedish Fish

Photo: FoodPhotography Eising via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Maine: Starburst

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Maryland: Almond Joy

Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

MassachusettsStarburst

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Michigan: M&M's

Photo: elevenmoments via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Minnesota: 100 Grand Bar

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Mississippi: Hershey's Kisses

Photo: Steven Mark Needham via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Missouri: Hershey's Kisses

Photo: Steven Mark Needham via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Montana: Kit Kat Bar

Photo: Newscast via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Nebraska: Skittles

Photo: Cassandra Hubbart, AOL

Source: Influenster

Nevada: Jolly Ranchers

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

New Hampshire: Tootsie Rolls

Photo: Victor Spinelli via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

New Jersey: Sour Patch Kids

Photo: Mat Hayward via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

New Mexico: 3 Musketeers

Photo: Myra Iqbal, AOL

Source: Influenster

New York: Sweet Tarts

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

North Carolina: Butterfinger

Photo: Mark Lennihan/AP

Source: Influenster

North Dakota: Sour Patch Kids

Photo: Mat Hayward via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Ohio: Milky Way

Photo: Cassandra Hubbart, AOL

Source: Influenster

Oklahoma: M&M's

Photo: elevenmoments via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Oregon: Candy corn

Photo: Garry Gay via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Pennsylvania : Swedish Fish

Photo: FoodPhotography Eising via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Rhode Island: Reese's Peanut Butter Cups

Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

South Carolina: Candy corn

Photo: Garry Gay via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

South Dakota: Laffy Taffy

Photo: Justin Sullivan via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Tennessee: Candy corn

Photo: Garry Gay via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Texas: Candy corn

Photo: Garry Gay via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Utah: Nerds

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Vermont: Almond Joy

Photo: The Washington Post via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Virginia: Reese's Pieces

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

Washington: AirHeads

Photo: Amazon

Source: Influenster

West Virginia: Oreos

Photo: bhofack2 via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Wisconsin: Laffy Taffy

Photo: Justin Sullivan via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

Wyoming: Candy corn

Photo: Garry Gay via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

District of Columbia: Twix

Photo: ullstein bild via Getty Images

Source: Influenster

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

So what does that mean? Taking into consideration that the average person weighs 180 lbs., it means you'd have to eat almost five and a half pounds of the stuff, or an astonishing 262 fun-sized candy bars or 1,627 pieces of candy corn in one sitting.

According to USA Today, your body, and your liver in particular, would be unable to break down the glucose in that amount of sugar and would likely go into shock.

Instead of doing that, consider donating your leftover Halloween candy to campaigns like Operation Gratitude and Soldiers' Angels, which receive mountains of candy each year to distribute to charities.

This movement started more than 10 years ago with dentists and orthodontists wanting to offload candy from children to prevent obesity and cavities, sometimes in exchange for toys and prizes.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Best Bites by AOL and receive delicious recipes delivered to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.