What do those numbers on your fruit really mean?

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By Susana Victoria Perez, Veuer

Ever wonder what the numbers and codes on your fruit mean?

Well, even though those tiny stickers can be a pain, the answer is simple -- and it can give you a little backstory about where your fruit came from.

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The code on those tiny stickers is known as a PLU code or price look-up number and have been used in supermarkets all over the world since 1990.

There are three kinds of codes that will tell you if your fruit has been grown conventionally, organically or if it has been genetically-modified.

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Eating bananas, grapes and apples as an adolescent helped lower one's risk of breast cancer, while the same occurred when eating oranges in early adulthood.
​Eating bananas, grapes and apples as an adolescent helped lower one's risk of breast cancer, while the same occurred when eating oranges in early adulthood.
​Eating bananas, grapes and apples as an adolescent helped lower one's risk of breast cancer, while the same occurred when eating oranges in early adulthood.
​Eating bananas, grapes and apples as an adolescent helped lower one's risk of breast cancer, while the same occurred when eating oranges in early adulthood.
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Fruit that has been grown conventionally will have a 4-digit code like 4131.

Organic fruit will have a 5-digit code that will always start with the number 9. They are also labeled organic on the sticker.

Genetically modified fruit will always have a 5-digit code starting with the number 8.

So, as much as we may dislike them, the stickers or labels attached to fruit do more than speed up the scanning process at the checkout stand.

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