Mixing alcohol and energy drinks affects young minds like cocaine

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Byline: Patrick Jones

You might have heard that mixing energy drinks with alcohol is not the healthiest choice. It turns out, this may be even worse than you thought.

This is especially true for younger people.

A study conducted by scientists at Purdue University looked into this dangerous cocktail, and the results were published in a journal called, "Alcohol."

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In the journal, researchers studied the effects of a combination of alcohol and highly caffeinated beverages using adolescent mice.

The mice ended up showing physical and neurochemical signs similar to mice who were given cocaine. This leads the study to conclude the combination of energy drinks and alcohol on a young person's brain could be as severe as cocaine and morphine.

There are many reasons as to why the same tests cannot be performed on young humans to verify these findings, but the study goes on to find more shocking evidence.

The effects in the mind apparently last very long, which causes the body to build a tolerance to the high. This could lead to a person consuming more to achieve the same effect they were chasing, which exposes them to further physiological harm.

Considering energy drinks are mainly marketed to and consumed by younger people, these findings prove to be extremely alarming.

Perhaps the study could lead to a new surgeon general's warning. Until then, it may be best to stick to club soda.

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