You may want to wait to get your flu shot

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By Patrick Jones, Buzz60

As winter approaches, so does flu season.

If you're one of the early birds who wants to jump out there and get your flu shot out of the way, you may want to hold your horses.

SEE ALSO: Sitting for more than 3 hours per day is responsible for almost 4 percent of deaths worldwide

According to the CEO of Merchant Medicine whose job it is to track the walk-in clinic industry, it's not clear how long the vaccine's effects will last, particularly in the elderly.

PHOTOS: How the flu vaccine is made

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How the flu vaccine is made
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How the flu vaccine is made
Quality control manager Nina Kotlyarova prepares to check samples for unwanted bacteria as part of the process for making an influenza vaccine at Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. After a limited distribution last season, Protein Sciences Corporation expects to ship 1 million doses of Flublok for this coming flu season. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A bioreactor stands in the production facilities of Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on a greater variety of vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Quality control manager Nina Kotlyarova prepares to check samples for unwanted bacteria as part of the process for making an influenza vaccine at Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on additional vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Protein Sciences CEO Manon Cox speaks to a reporter in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on more vaccine options for the coming flu season. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A bioreactor, left, stands in the production facilities of Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on addational vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
In this Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 photo, slides of human cells that have been exposed to the flu virus and dyed to bring out the cells fighting the virus are shown on a holder, at the Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health's laboratory, in Seattle. State health officials say state labs have confirmed at least 120 flu deaths since the season started in September, but only a fraction of those who die from the flu are tested for the virus. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 photo, Paul Swenson, director of the Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health's laboratory, works under the protective glass of a biological safety cabinet as he exposes human cells to a suspected flu virus taken with a swab from the throat of a sick person, in Seattle. State health officials say state labs have confirmed at least 120 flu deaths since the season started in September, but only a fraction of those who die from the flu are tested for the virus. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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The reason why you start to see reminders in August and September about getting your flu shot is the same reason you start seeing Christmas stuff in stores in October -- marketing!

If you are wondering when the best time to get it really is, the answer is late October and early November.

That's when experts say it will be the most protective, because the normal flu season spans from November into February.

Of course, an early flu shot is better than no flu shot, so if you find yourself at the doctor sometime soon, don't feel bad about getting it over with.

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