Study reveals the real reason people feel better after ditching gluten

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Going gluten free is the hot new fad, but what is the real reason a gluten free diet is making some feel better?

When it comes to being healthy experts say only about 1% of Americans actually have celiac disease, a rare genetic disorder the makes people intolerant to gluten.

Still, so many people say they feel better after dropping gluten. So why is that?

RELATED: Gluten-free products

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Gluten-free products are displayed for sale at the Bob's Red Mill and Natural Foods store in Milwaukie, Oregon, U.S., on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods, a pioneering manufacturer of delicious and safe gluten free products, produces over 400 products, primarily whole grains as well as beans, seeds, nuts, dried fruits, spices, and herbs. Photographer: Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CHICAGO - DECEMBER 27: Anheuser-Busch's Redbridge beer is shown December 27, 2006 in Chicago. The beer is aimed towarded people with wheat allergies and others who choose a gluten-free diet. Redbridge is made from sorghum rather than the traditional ingredients, wheat and barley. The new offering is one of many beer makers have rolled out to offset a steady decline in sales of their traditional brands. (Photo Illustration by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
'Gluten Free' appears on the packaging for General Mills Inc. Betty Crocker brand cake mix displayed for sale at a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to define the term 'gluten-free' when voluntarily used in food labeling, according to a notice published in the Aug. 5 Federal Register. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Many people today try to avoid gluten due to dietary restrictions or health concerns. Muffins baked with Namaste Foods Gluten Free Perfect Flour Blend yields good browning but an interior that is not as pleasant looking. (Bill Hogan/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images)
'Gluten Free' appears on the packaging for PepsiCo Inc. Quaker brand rice cakes displayed for sale at a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to define the term 'gluten-free' when voluntarily used in food labeling, according to a notice published in the Aug. 5 Federal Register. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
'Gluten Free' appears on cans of black bean soup at a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. On Aug. 2, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration defined Ògluten-freeÓ as food that contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Food makers will have one year to ensure labels on their cans and boxes meet the standard. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
'Gluten Free' appears on the packaging for General Mills Inc. Betty Crocker Bisquick brand pancake and baking mix displayed for sale at a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to define the term 'gluten-free' when voluntarily used in food labeling, according to a notice published in the Aug. 5 Federal Register. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The logo for the Celiac Disease Foundation appears on the packaging for General Mills Inc. Betty Crocker brand gluten-free cake mix displayed for sale at a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to define the term 'gluten-free' when voluntarily used in food labeling, according to a notice published in the Aug. 5 Federal Register. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
'Gluten Free' appears on the packaging for 5 Sisters brand pasta sauce displayed for sale at a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to define the term 'gluten-free' when voluntarily used in food labeling, according to a notice published in the Aug. 5 Federal Register. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gluten-free products sit on display for sale at a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to define the term 'gluten-free' when voluntarily used in food labeling, according to a notice published in the Aug. 5 Federal Register. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
'Gluten Free' appears on the packaging for General Mills Inc. Betty Crocker brand cookie mix displayed for sale at a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to define the term 'gluten-free' when voluntarily used in food labeling, according to a notice published in the Aug. 5 Federal Register. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2013, file photo, a variety of foods labeled Gluten Free are displayed in Frederick, Md., Friday, Aug. 2, 2013. Starting this week, "gluten free" labels on packaged foods have real meaning. Until now, the term "gluten free" had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)
FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, file photo, gluten-free products are seen on a grocery store shelf in Washington. In homes across the country on Thanksgiving Day, tables will be set to accommodate everyone from vegans and vegetarians to those trying to eat like a caveman. Increasingly complicated Thanksgiving feasts reflect the growing ranks of Americans who are paying closer attention to the food they put in their bodies. (AP Photo/Carole Feldman, File)
This undated handout photo provided by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shows a gluten free labeling on a box of pretzel chips. Consumers are going to know exactly what they are getting when they buy foods labeled "gluten free." The FDA is at last defining what a "gluten free" label on a food package really means after more than six years of consideration. Until now, manufacturers have been able to use their own discretion as to how much gluten they include. Under an FDA rule announced Friday, products labeled "gluten free" still won't have to be technically free of wheat, rye and barley and their derivatives. But they almost will: "Gluten-free" products will have to contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten. (AP Photo/FDA)
** FOR USE WITH AP WEEKLY FEATURES ** Purely Decadent Dairy Free, Gluten Free, Cookie Dough ice cream from Turtle Mountain, shown in this May 21, 2007 photo, gets rid of the dairy while providing a satisfying taste. (AP Photo/Larry Crowe)
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Alan Levinovitz is an assistant professor at James Madison University and author of the book 'The Gluten Lie'.

He says the real reason people feel better after saying goodbye to gluten is that people then start buying veggies, cooking and eating healthier in general.

They change their diet. So, in other words, while cutting gluten may seem like it helps you lose weight or clears up your complexion, the reality is that 500 other things could be the real cause.

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