10 fun part-time jobs for retirement

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Many retirees need to earn some extra money to make ends meet in retirement. But you don't have to drudge through life to bring in some extra cash. Consider one of these fun job options for retirees:

1. Babysitting. If you love to spend time with kids, you might as well earn some money at the same time. Babysitting is often a flexible part-time job that allows you to work when you want to. To make a steady income, you could become a part-time nanny or daycare provider for one or more kids. Or offer your services on evenings and weekends, giving parents a chance to get out. You might even be able to work out an arrangement with your children to babysit your own grandchildren on a regular basis.

[See: 10 Ways to Make Extra Money in Retirement.]

2. Uber. If you like to drive,Uber provides flexible hours and a chance to meet people from all over the world. To get started, you'll need a car that meets Uber's standards and a valid driver's license. The job will be easier if you know your way around your local area.

3. Crafting. If you love making quilts, wooden furniture or doll clothes, there's someone out there who would love to buy your craft. It's easy to open an Etsy shop on your home computer, but you'll have to put some effort into marketing to sell a lot of handmade goods. Or you could set up a booth at local craft shows to display and sell the items you make.

RELATED: The best US cities for stretching your retirement nest egg:

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Best cities for stretching your retirement nest egg
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Best cities for stretching your retirement nest egg

25. Orlando, Fla.

  • Annual healthcare services: $6,126.37
  • Annual taxes: $3,651.94
  • Annual utilities: $3,886.59
  • Annual housing: $8,780.50
  • Overall cost of living: $46,696.15

Located in one of the best states to retire in the U.S., Orlando offers a potential benefit for retirees: Your kids and grandchildren might visit you more often so they can go to Walt Disney World, Universal Studios Florida and SeaWorld Orlando. When your kids are looking to knock out two birds with one stone — take their children on vacation and visit you at the same time — Orlando could be the perfect lure.

(bobbyuzda via Getty Images)

24. Charlotte, N.C.

  • Annual healthcare services: $6,031.32
  • Annual taxes: $3,595.27
  • Annual utilities: $3,826.29
  • Annual housing: $8,644.26
  • Overall cost of living: $45,971.63

You can make your retirement savings last in Charlotte, and you could also earn some money back on your home’s value if you decide to move again. Zillow's data shows home values have been on an upward trend over the last couple of years and predicts they will rise about 4 percent in the coming year.

See: The Best City to Buy a Home in Every State

23. St. Paul, Minn.

  • Annual healthcare services: $6,001.18
  • Annual taxes: $3,577.31
  • Annual utilities: $3,807.17
  • Annual housing: $8,601.07
  • Overall cost of living: $45,741.90

If you want to move to Minnesota, consider St. Paul over other popular cities — such as Minneapolis. Not only is St. Paul less expensive than Minneapolis, according to Sperling's Best Places, but the crime rate is also lower. St. Paul also shines in terms of healthcare, having 279 physicians per 100,000 population compared to the U.S. average of 210.

22. Louisville, Ky.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,954.81
  • Annual taxes: $3,549.67
  • Annual utilities: $3,777.75
  • Annual housing: $8,534.61
  • Overall cost of living: $45,388.48

Cost of living in Louisville is low compared to the U.S. average, especially when it comes to housing, according to Sperling's. And, there are 335 physicians per 100,000 population.

See: Best and Worst States for Health Insurance Costs

21. Indianapolis

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,944.96
  • Annual taxes: $3,543.79
  • Annual utilities: $3,771.50
  • Annual housing: $8,520.49
  • Overall cost of living: $45,313.37

For retirees trying to live life on a budget, cost of living in Indianapolis is lower than the national average. To save on housing, neighborhoods outside of the I-465 loop tend to offer a balanced combination of low-cost living and lower crime rates, reports Movoto.

20. Atlanta

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,942.64
  • Annual taxes: $3,542.41
  • Annual utilities: $3,770.03
  • Annual housing: $8,517.17
  • Overall cost of living: $45,295.70

The population of seniors has grown considerably — 20.3 percent — in Atlanta in recent years, reports Forbes. And, it's one of the best cities in the country for a healthy and affordable retirement, offering a satisfying senior social life, access to healthcare and more, according to Sperling’s.

19. Houston

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,922.93
  • Annual taxes: $3,530.66
  • Annual utilities: $3,757.53
  • Annual housing: $8,488.92
  • Overall cost of living: $45,145.50

Houston is a booming metropolis and a good choice for making your retirement savings last. In fact, it's one of the 50 cheapest places to retire. Health costs are cheaper in Houston than the U.S. overall, according to Sperling's. The city also provides easy access to top medical facilities, including the Texas Medical Center — the world’s largest medical complex.

18. Tampa, Fla.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,882.36
  • Annual taxes: $3,506.48
  • Annual utilities: $3,731.79
  • Annual housing: $8,430.77
  • Overall cost of living: $44,836.25

Tampa boasts affordable rent and cost of living expenses, including groceries, according to Numbeo data. Many suburbs around Tampa have great retiree-friendly amenities such as golf courses, libraries, volunteer activities and more, reports Movoto. And with home values on an upward trend, it could be one of the best cities to own investment property.

17. Memphis, Tenn.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,838.89
  • Annual taxes: $3,480.57
  • Annual utilities: $3,704.21
  • Annual housing: $8,368.47
  • Overall cost of living: $44,504.92

Memphis is affordable, making it a great place to stretch your retirement savings. The cost of living is more than 25 percent lower than the nation's average, according to Sperling's. On a broader level, retirees will appreciate Tennessee’s total tax burden — it's one of the best states for taxes.

16. Newark, N.J.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,835.41
  • Annual taxes: $3,478.49
  • Annual utilities: $3,702
  • Annual housing: $8,363.49
  • Overall cost of living: $44,478.41

Newark’s housing market could help you grow your nest egg — if you're looking to make a good investment in real estate. Home values rose by nearly 20 percent over the last year, and Zillow forecasts they will continue to rise within the next year.

15. Columbus, Ohio

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,820.34
  • Annual taxes: $3,469.51
  • Annual utilities: $3,692.44
  • Annual housing: $8,341.89
  • Overall cost of living: $44,363.55

Fortunately for retirees, Columbus' cost of living is lower than the U.S. average. And a little further outside the city, retirees can find affordable suburbs with high proportions of residents age 65 and up, such as Lithopolis and Canal Winchester, reports Movoto.

14. Nashville, Tenn.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,808.17
  • Annual taxes: $3,462.26
  • Annual utilities: $3,684.72
  • Annual housing: $8,324.44
  • Overall cost of living: $44,270.77

If you're thinking about retiring near Nashville, consider Ridgetop, Hendersonville or Oak Hill — all three suburbs ranked among Niche's top 20 places to retire in Tennessee.

13. Bakersfield, Calif.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,796
  • Annual taxes: $3,455
  • Annual utilities: $3,677
  • Annual housing: $8,307
  • Overall cost of living: $44,178.00

If you want to escape the hustle and bustle of big cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles, Bakersfield might offer refuge. Not only will your $100,000 go far in the first couple years of retirement, but another GOBankingRates.com study found it's the No. 2 city where your paycheck will stretch the furthest.

See the Rankings: 10 Cities Where Your Paycheck Goes the Furthest

12. Phoenix

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,765.28
  • Annual taxes: $3,436.69
  • Annual utilities: $3,657.51
  • Annual housing: $8,262.97
  • Overall cost of living: $43,943.86

Like other cities on this list, Phoenix is experiencing a marked increase in the population of seniors, reports Forbes. Other nearby areas you might want to consider for more senior-friendly amenities — such as restaurants, retirement homes and recreation centers — include Litchfield Park, Sun City and Florence city, reports Movoto.

11. Austin, Texas

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,752.53
  • Annual taxes: $3,429.09
  • Annual utilities: $3,649.42
  • Annual housing: $8,244.70
  • Overall cost of living: $43,846.67

Austin saw a substantial growth in its population of senior citizens from 2010 to 2014, reports Forbes. With minimal unemployment and major job growth projected for the future, the city offers many opportunities for retirees who might want to re-enter the workforce.

See: 10 Best Cities for Baby Boomers to Find Work

10. Dallas

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,748.47
  • Annual taxes: $3,426.67
  • Annual utilities: $3,646.85
  • Annual housing: $8,238.88
  • Overall cost of living: $43,815.74

Although Dallas is one of the top cities experiencing skyrocketing home prices, it's still an affordable place for retirees looking to stretch their retirement savings. The cost of living is still lower than the U.S. average, and Sperling's estimates future job growth over the next 10 years will be more than 42 percent.

9. Sioux Falls, S.D.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,710.80
  • Annual taxes: $3,404.21
  • Annual utilities: $3,622.95
  • Annual housing: $8,184.89
  • Overall cost of living: $43,528.58

Your nest egg can go further in Sioux Falls. Plus, the city offers work opportunities for retirees — more than a third of people age 60 and older are employed in the city, reported U.S. News.

8. Tulsa, Okla.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,662.69
  • Annual taxes: $3,375.54
  • Annual utilities: $3,592.43
  • Annual housing: $8,115.94
  • Overall cost of living: $43,161.91

The cost of living in Tulsa is about lower than the national average, according to Sperling's. And homes are pretty affordable, too. The median home listing price is $159,900, according to Zillow.

7. Madison, Wis.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,660.95
  • Annual taxes: $3,374.50
  • Annual utilities: $3,591.33
  • Annual housing: $8,113.45
  • Overall cost of living: $43,148.65

In 2014, the Milken Institute ranked Madison as the No. 1 best large metro in its Best Cities for Successful Aging report, largely thanks to the city's high-quality healthcare and healthy environment.

6. Kansas City, Mo.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,653.42
  • Annual taxes: $3,370.01
  • Annual utilities: $3,586.55
  • Annual housing: $8,102.65
  • Overall cost of living: $43,091.22

Low living expenses, notably on groceries, help make Kansas City one of the most affordable places to retire. Plus, buying a home in Kansas City is affordable — the median home price is only $165,000, according to Zillow.

5. Rochester, N.Y.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,601.25
  • Annual taxes: $3,338.91
  • Annual utilities: $3,553.45
  • Annual housing: $8,027.88
  • Overall cost of living: $42,693.62

Saving on retirement living expenses in Rochester shouldn't be that big of a challenge. After all, the city’s cost of living is almost 18 percent cheaper than the country’s average, according to Sperling's.

4. Salt Lake City

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,593.72
  • Annual taxes: $3,334.42
  • Annual utilities: $3,548.67
  • Annual housing: $8,017.09
  • Overall cost of living: $42,636.19

Your retirement savings should go far in Salt Lake City. But if you prefer living in suburbs, consider these top picks from Movoto: Bountiful, which has beautiful retirement housing options, and Midvale, which might attract active retirees.

3. Albuquerque, N.M.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,477.22
  • Annual taxes: $3,264.98
  • Annual utilities: $3,474.77
  • Annual housing: $7,850.12
  • Overall cost of living: $41,748.21

Albuquerque is also one of the top cities where your paycheck and retirement savings go far. And when it comes to healthcare, retirees benefit from the fact the city has 233 physicians per 100,000 population, which is higher than the U.S. average of 210.

2. Tucson, Ariz.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,445.92
  • Annual taxes: $3,246.32
  • Annual utilities: $3,454.91
  • Annual housing: $7,805.26
  • Overall cost of living: $41,509.65

Nearly 18 percent of the population in Tucson are senior citizens, reports Forbes. Besides being an excellent city to stretch your retirement savings, Tucson also offers one of the cheapest rents on apartments in the U.S.

1. Oklahoma City, Okla.

  • Annual healthcare services: $5,425.64
  • Annual taxes: $3,234.23
  • Annual utilities: $3,442.04
  • Annual housing: $7,776.18
  • Overall cost of living: $41,355.03

Oklahoma City is one of the best cities where your $100,000 retirement savings will go far in your first couple of years in retirement. And according to another GOBankingRates.com study, you only need to make about $44,180 to live comfortably.

Up Next: How Much Money You Need to Live Comfortably in the 50 Biggest Cities

Methodology: Cities were ranked based on their cost of living index relative to the average annual expenditures for retirees 65 and older. In order to find the average annual expenditures for retirees 65 and older, GOBankingRates.com used data from the BLS Consumer Expenditure Survey. Cost of living indices were taken from Numbeo on Nov. 30, 2016.

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4. Gardening.Put your green thumb to work by selling home-grown vegetables at a roadside stand or local farmer's market. If you're in a small town, you don't need a huge variety of veggies or cut flowers to sell at a weekly market. Remember to check with your local regulations before you get started.

5. Tour guide. This is a great gig for outgoing folks who live in an area that attracts tourists. Becoming a tour guide can help you get to know your town even better, including its history. Plus, you'll get to meet all sorts of interesting people. You can get a job with an existing tour company or start your own tour of your town's quirkiest areas.

[Read: How Working an Extra Year Improves Your Retirement Finances.]

6.Bartender. Getting a bartending license is fairly simple in most areas, and bartending can be a fun and flexible part-time job. You can work limited hours at a nearby bar or sign on with an event company to work whenever it suits you best.

7. Movie theater. Working at a movie theater could be a good fit for movie-loving retirees. You can often work limited hours that suit your schedule, and you can typically see current movies for free. If you like to see all the latest blockbusters, working in a movie theater could help you both earn money and reduce your entertainment costs.

8. Wedding or event planner. If you're a type-A list maker with an eye for detail, wedding or event planning may be the perfect part-time gig for you. This job can sometimes be stressful, but you can set your own hours and help create beautiful events.

9. Cruise ship work. Working on a cruise ship is typically a full-time job when you're actually on the ship, but you don't have to work year-round. Whatever your skill set, there's a cruise ship job to match it. You could be a housekeeper, server or retail assistant. Or you could put your current hobby skills to use by teaching a class for cruise goers. Cruise ship work is a great way to see the world.

RELATED: 21 states raising their minimum wages:

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21 states paying workers more in 2017
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21 states paying workers more in 2017

Alaska

2016 minimum wage: $9.75
2017 minimum wage: $9.80

Arizona

2016 minimum wage: $8.05
2017 minimum wage: $10
Arkansas

2016 minimum wage:
$8
2017 minimum wage: $8.50

California

2016 minimum wage: $10
2017 minimum wage: $10.50

Colorado

2016 minimum wage: $8.31
2017 minimum wage: $9.30

Connecticut

2016 minimum wage: $9.60
2017 minimum wage: $10.10

Florida

2016 minimum wage: $8.05
2017 minimum wage: $8.10

Hawaii

2016 minimum wage: $8.50
2017 minimum wage: $9.25

Maine

2016 minimum wage: $7.50
2017 minimum wage: $9

Maryland

2016 minimum wage: $8.75
2017 minimum wage: $9.25

Massachusetts

2016 minimum wage: $10
2017 minimum wage: $11

Michigan

2016 minimum wage: $8.50
2017 minimum wage: $8.90

Missouri

2016 minimum wage: $7.65
2017 minimum wage: $7.70

Montana

2016 minimum wage: $8.05
2017 minimum wage: $8.15

New Jersey

2016 minimum wage: $8.38
2017 minimum wage: $8.44

New York

2016 minimum wage: $9
2017 minimum wage: $9.70

Ohio

2016 minimum wage: $8.10
2017 minimum wage: $8.15

Oregon

2016 minimum wage: $9.75
2017 minimum wage: $10.25

South Dakota

2016 minimum wage: $8.55
2017 minimum wage: $8.65

Vermont

2016 minimum wage: $9.60
2017 minimum wage: $10

Washington

2016 minimum wage: $9.47
2017 minimum wage: $11

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[See: 10 Jobs Hiring Older Workers.]

10. Pet sitting. Animal lovers could find a relaxed part-time job as a pet sitter. Many pet owners are willing to pay to avoid taking their precious pooches to the kennel during a vacation or business trip. Just put the word out, and you could find yourself raking in some side income while snuggling with other people's pets.

Copyright 2016 U.S. News & World Report

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