A senior Wall Street banker explains why he likes hiring vets

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Deutsche Bank's corporate and investment bank vice chairman John Eydenberg makes no bones about the fact that he loves hiring veterans.

For one thing, he said, they have the right kind of confidence.

"They take all your confidence away and break you down to your most humble self, and then they help you bring it back," Eydenberg, who was an officer in the US Navy, told Business Insider.

Related: Honoring heroes on Veterans Day

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Veterans Day 2016

Glen Newton 24-years-old, Air Force wipes a tear as he kneels down to visit his grandfather at Ft. Logan National Cemetery November 11, 2016 on Veterans Day. His grandfather, Joe Bolton was a Capt. in the US Army, Vietnam. Bolton passed October 26, 2016.

(Photo By John Leyba/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

U.S. President Barack Obama lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery on Veterans Day in Virginia November 11, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

A veteran takes part in Remembrance Day ceremonies at the National War Memorial in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, November 11, 2016.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

People carry a giant American flag as they march in the Veterans Day Parade in New York City on November 11, 2016 in New York City. Known as 'America's Parade' it features over 20,000 participants, including veterans of numerous eras, military units, businesses and high school bands and civic and youth groups.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Wearing fatigues just like her mother's, Madison Bhramdat salutes as her mother is honored during a U.S. Army enlistment, reenlistment, and promotion ceremony during a Salute to Service honoring veterans ahead of Veterans' Day at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum plaza, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, in New York. Bhramdat's mother was promoted from rank of Army Staff Sgt. by U.S. Under Army Under Secretary Patrick J. Murphy.

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

People attend the Veterans Day Parade in New York City on November 11, 2016 in New York City. Known as 'America's Parade' it features over 20,000 participants, including veterans of numerous eras, military units, businesses and high school bands and civic and youth groups.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Volunteer Ryan Young takes a rubbing of a name engraved on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, U.S., on Veterans Day November 11, 2016.

(REUTERS/Gary Cameron)

U.S. Marines stand next to bouquets as war historians march during the Veteran's Day parade in New York, U.S., November 11, 2016.

(REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

People carry a giant American flag as they march in the Veterans Day Parade in New York City on November 11, 2016 in New York City. Known as 'America's Parade' it features over 20,000 participants, including veterans of numerous eras, military units, businesses and high school bands and civic and youth groups.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Military personnel march in the annual Veteran's Day parade in New York, Friday, Nov. 11, 2016.

(AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

Sun glints through the artificial flowers set next to the gravestone to mark Veterans Day in Fort Logan National Cemetery on Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, in Sheridan, Colo.

(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Veteran Rafael Lugo, 81, from Puerto Rico, who served in the military for 23 years watch the annual Veterans Day parade in New York, Friday, Nov. 11, 2016.

(AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

A young boy sits on his Veteran father's shoulders during the annual Veterans Day Parade on November 11, 2016 in New York City. Known as 'America's Parade' it features over 20,000 participants, including veterans of numerous eras, military units, businesses and high school bands and civic and youth groups.

(Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

World War Two Army veteran Herman Zeitchik attends Memorial day services at the World War II Memorial in Washington, U.S., November 11, 2016.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Veterans ride motorcycles in the Veterans Day Parade in New York City on November 11, 2016 in New York City. Known as 'America's Parade' it features over 20,000 participants, including veterans of numerous eras, military units, businesses and high school bands and civic and youth groups.

(Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Vice President-elect Mike Pence talks with Adjutant General, Maj. Gen. Courtney P. Carr during a Veterans Day ceremony at Camp Atterbury in Edinburgh, Ind., Friday, Nov. 11, 2016.

(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Military personnel march in the annual Veterans Day parade in New York, Friday, Nov. 11, 2016.

(AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Cyril Illidge, left, shows the reflecting pool to Madison Bhramdat who was waiting for her mother Radha Bhramdat to be promoted during an army swearing-in, enlistment, reenlistment ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum plaza, part of a Salute to Service honoring veterans ahead of Veterans' Day, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, in New York.

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 11: Air Force cadets join Madame Tussauds to unveil all-American hero Captain America in honor of Veterans Day at Nellis Air Force Base on November 11, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Isaac Brekken/Getty Images for Madame Tussauds Las Vegas)
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"Veterans tend to be very grounded with a degree of humility that can be very helpful in client businesses."

Eydenberg said the kind of person he would prefer to have working for him is a problem-solver who can work through difficult situations, rather than someone who always has the right answer.

Another important point: leadership training is one of the first things new recruits will undergo when they join the military. Leadership, Eydenberg said, is an essential trait in the business world.

"Things that I really have cared about as I've had more and more influence over how we treat our people, develop our people, is choosing leaders, what we expect of our leaders," Eydenberg told Business Insider.

Of course, you can pick up a number of important hard skills in the military too. For example, officer training is fairly mathematically rigorous, Eydenberg said.

"The academic piece is more [about] tools," he said. "The things that are more fundamental are leadership, resilience, teamwork, and confidence."

Deutsche Bank is a member of the organization Veterans on Wall Street, along with Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, and HSBC. It aims to help recent veterans find career and business opportunities in finance through networking, mentoring, and outreach.

Eydenberg said that this year, 18 interns across Deutsche Bank's investment bank and markets businesses — or about 10% of the class — have some military service experience.

"We've been really excited about the vets we've brought on," Eydenberg said. "We've found they do a great job in their day job — but then they commit to culture, make a big impact on culture, too."

Vets tend to participate in volunteering initiatives and company events, he said. For example, when Deutsche Bank sponsored a float in the pride parade last summer, a number of the firms veterans attended.

"A lot of them want to keep serving, they want to have a higher purpose," Eydenberg said.

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