An eerie look inside the infamous 'Black Dahlia' murder home

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A gorgeous home with a mysterious (and possibly very gruesome) past, 5121 Franklin Avenue in Hollywood, California is bound to give you all that its listing offers – plus some unmentioned and troublesome backstory.

Though the case was never solved, the home is thought to be the location of the 1947 murder of Elizabeth Short a.k.a. the "Black Dahlia", as investigators called her.

SEE ALSO: Here's how much the house where the JonBenet Ramsey murder took place sold for

Short's body was found on January 15, 1947 in a vacant lot near the property, the top suspect being the home's owner Dr. George Hodel.

Hodel's biggest accuser was his son, former LAPD homicide detective Steve Hodel.

In 2013, Steve Hodel brought a search dog to the property and as Hodel had hoped, the dog found something quite alarming – the dog had alerted in four different locations, meaning that it had picked up the scent of human decomposition.

Take a look through this eerie yet beautiful home here:

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Black Dahlia murder house
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Black Dahlia murder house
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
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Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
Photo credit: Redfin
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The home's listing boasts that it was "designed for entertaining," and it's clear that Wright's intention was exactly that.

The four-bedroom, five-bathroom home was designed for Wright's good friend John Snowden, a famed painter and photographer who wanted a place where we could entertain the finest of Hollywood's social scene.

Also referred to as "The Snowden House," the intricate placement of textile blocks and Mayan-style architecture make the house look more like a palace of bizarre grandeur than anything else, which would explain why it's earned a spot on the National Registry of Historic Places and been named a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

It was renovated in the early 2000s, which added a picture-perfect pool and spa, restored much of the stonework and opened the kitchen.

It's on the market for $4.795M, answers as to what actually happened to Elizabeth Short that night not included in the price.

If you thought that was creepy, check out these pictures of the childhood home where serial killer Jeffery Dahmer grew up:

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Jeffrey Dahmer's childhood home
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Jeffrey Dahmer's childhood home
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