Uber's self-driving truck makes successful beer delivery

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

A driverless Uber truck loaded with 50,000 cans of Budweiser beer made a 120-mile journey across Colorado last week in the first commercial shipment by a self-driving truck.

Otto is Uber's self-driving truck subsidiary. Its vehicles can drive autonomously on the highway, leaving the driver free to do other tasks, or relax.

Otto's Volvo trucks are retrofitted with lidar, radar and cameras, which collect data that onboard computers translate into driving directions, Wired reported.

See pictures of the truck:

9 PHOTOS
Uber’s self-driving truck makes successful beer delivery
See Gallery
Uber’s self-driving truck makes successful beer delivery
Uber-owned trucking startup Otto's first self-driving trip was a beer run https://t.co/WyYsg7EAnA https://t.co/tnOZjt5n0t
Jacob Larry, operations staff at Otto, checks on the software of a self-driving, big-rig truck during a demonstration on the highway, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

An Autonomous trucking start-up Otto vehicle is shown during an announcing event in Concord, California, U.S. August 4, 2016.

(REUTERS/Alexandria Sage/File Photo)

Matt Grigsby, senior program engineer at Otto, takes his hands off the steering wheel of the self-driving, big-rig truck during a demonstration on the highway, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016, in San Francisco. 

(AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

Uber and Anheuser-Busch make first autonomous trucking beer delivery https://t.co/rKKCVmis6g https://t.co/yykcgwaSyX

Matt Grigsby, left, senior program engineer at Otto, and Jacob Larry, operations staff at Otto, takes a self-driving, big-rig truck for a test drive on the highway Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016, in San Francisco.

(AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

Matt Grigsby, senior program engineer at Otto, engages the self-driving big rig truck during a demonstration Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016, in San Francisco.

 (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

Don Burnette, senior staff engineer at Otto, checks the software on a computer in the back of the self-driving, big-rig truck during a demonstration at the Otto headquarters on Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016, in San Francisco.

(AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

The self-driving trucks maintain a safe distance from other vehicles and only change lanes when necessary. The technology only works on the highway so drivers are still needed to navigate trickier city roads.

Otto believes that in the future self-driving trucks will drive on the interstate, with human drivers handling the last few miles into town.

Trucks haul 70 percent of freight in the U.S., but the industry has a shortfall of 48,000 drivers, which could reach 175,000 within 10 years, Wired reported, citing the American Trucking Association.

Otto hopes that driverless trucks can make up the deficit of drivers, reduce emissions and increase efficiency. It also thinks driverless trucks will make roads safer by reducing human error. There are 400,000 truck crashes in the U.S. each year, which claim 4,000 lives, Wired reported, citing federal statistics.

Read Full Story

Want more news like this?

Sign up for Finance Report by AOL and get everything from business news to personal finance tips delivered directly to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners