Avocado prices skyrocket amid shortage

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There's bad news for avocado lovers: A nationwide shortage of the popular fruit has sent avocado prices through the roof.

According to Time, the U.S. typically receives about 40 million pounds of avocados each week from Mexico. But that hasn't been the case lately. Just two weeks ago, the U.S. received a mere 13 million pounds of the popular fatty fruit.

Most of the avocados eaten in the U.S. come from Mexico, where avocado growers have been withholding the green fruit in an effort to negotiate higher prices for it, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

A weak avocado harvest in California this summer and early fall exacerbated the shortage.

Phil Henry, president of Henry Avocado Co. — a grower and importer in San Diego — tells the Chronicle that even after price negotiations with Mexican avocado growers are resolved, there will still be a waiting period for avocado-hungry consumers.

RELATED: 10 supermarket traps you should avoid at all costs:

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10 supermarket traps

Large shopping carts

According to Martin Lindstrom, the larger the shopping cart, the more likely you are to spend. The marketing consultant told The Consumerist"We doubled their size as a test, and customers bought 19% more."

Pleasing aromas and colorful sights

Walking into a grocery store and smelling freshly baked goods and flowers, especially if you're in a good mood, is a surefire way to get you to throw a few unnecessary items into your cart as your begin shopping experience.

Fresh produce first​

After you've already been tricked into picking up a loaf of bread or some flowers, supermarkets also get you by placing the produce in the front of the store. By doing this, they fool you into believing you're being healthier by shopping for fruits and veggies first so you won't feel bad if you decide to stock up on a few unhealthier snacks along the way to checkout, too.

Mist on produce

You may think the mist on fresh fruits and veggies is helping the produce, but in all actuality, it makes them rot faster. Also, be sure to shake off the access water before purchasing your produce -- the mist tends to add additional weight, making the price go up.

Slow, boring music

Have you ever wondered why most grocery stores play some sort of elevator music? It's because they want you to take your time while shopping. Many stores play music slower than the average heartbeat, so pop your headphones in and play upbeat music to combat this trick.

10-for-$10 promotions

It's common to believe you're getting a great deal during a 10-for-$10 promotion, but say, if a can of beans was originally 87 cents, you're actually paying more versus buying 10 of the same cans when they aren't on "sale."

Dairy being in the back of the store

The reasoning behind the age-old trick of placing milk and other dairy products in the back of the store may surprise you. Although it forces you to walk through various aisles, the true reason is because trucks unload their shipments in the back of store, and since milk needs to be refrigerated immediately, the easiest place to keep it is in the back.

More expensive items at eye level

If you've ever wondered why all of the expensive items seem to be the most accessible, there's a reason behind that, too. Supermarkets place cheaper items on the lower and higher shelves and reserve the middle, or eyesight level, shelves for their most expensive products.

Buying premium deli products

Just because you are buying a seemingly fresh cut of meat or fish from the deli and paying a higher price, doesn't necessarily mean the product is of better quality. Often times, the meat was previously frozen meaning you may have to use it sooner than meat you would buy from the frozen section.

Changing the layout of the store... often

Don't get too comfortable with your local supermarket's layout. Markets believe that when a person remembers where there items they plan on buying are, they'll spend less time in the store and will ultimately spend less money.

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Henry says it takes several days to pack and ship avocados from Mexico to the U.S. After that, there's still a ripening lag time of two to four days before the fruit is sent out to supermarkets and restaurants.

Consumers and businesses alike are feeling the pinch of the avocado shortage. Some Mexican restaurants have been out of avocados for days. Others are hiking the price of their avocado dishes.

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Cynthia Guzman of Nature's Produce, a fresh fruit broker and distributor in California, tells e:

"We're not going to have any avocados for anybody for maybe a week and a half. We're seeing fruit out there at double the price it normally would be."

Some retailers are reporting avocados selling for three times their typical price.

Despite the avocado shortage, Mexican chain Chipotle says you can still eat all the guacamole you want at its restaurants. A spokesperson from Chipotle told Business Insider:

"We do not plan to raise prices for guacamole (we don't typically raise prices in response to short-term cyclical changes in food costs) and have not incurred any supply disruptions."

Have you noticed a shortage of avocados, or prices increases on the fruit at the supermarket? Share your comments below or on our Facebook page.

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