How a real Cuban cigar is made, shown in 13 gorgeous photos

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Now there's another great reason to visit Cuba: the Obama administration has just lifted restrictions on the number of cigars tourists can bring back to US soil. Americans can now carry up to 100 cigars without paying customs taxes.

Cuba's tobacco production can be compared to Napa Valley's wine culture — it's taken seriously and can be a big draw for tourists.

While foreign sales in cigars rose steadily through 2015, some Cuban tobacco farmers have earned an income by hosting international visitors, giving an inside look at how the cigars are produced.

One such farm is the family-run-and-owned Montesino. Located in Pinar del Rio, a little over an hour west of Havana, the farm is one of Cuba's most renowned tobacco producers. Here's how it makes a fine Cuban cigar.

14 PHOTOS
How real Cuban cigars are made
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How real Cuban cigars are made
In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Raul Valdes Villasusa, 76, smokes a cigar as he collects tobacco leaves on his farm in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Farmers earn money from the government for their tobacco crop, and keep a small portion for their own use. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, a tobacco worker spends the late afternoon grazing his horse on the roadside after hsi workday on the Yoandri Hernandez tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Workers say theyâre eager to see more benefits of Cubaâs increasing links to the outside world since the start of new relations with U.S., without losing the placid lifestyle of the last half-century. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Raul Valdes Villasusa, 76, shows his hands, hardened by years of work on his tobacco farm in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Villasusa, who grew up on his family's farm, said his operation is organic, not using any chemicals on his crop. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, residents travel in a former school bus to the center of the town of Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba, where tobacco farming is the main crop. Despite the flood of visitors since Cuba and the U.S. reestablished relations, some aspects of life in the provinceâs central Vinales valley have changed little. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Yoberlan Castillo Garcia waits as one of his horses drinks water on the small tobacco farm he runs with his brother-in-law in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Garcia said they call the horses they rent to tourists "automatics" because they return on their own. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, Jorge Luis Leon Becerra moves freshly picked tobacco leaves to a building where they will be dried on the Martinez tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Farmers in Cubaâs tobacco country are benefiting from the tourist boom since the U.S. and Cuba reestablished relations by converting their farms into tourist attractions. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, a worker takes a break under drying tobacco leaves at the Montesino tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. The Montesino farm has been in the same family for three generations and is one of the most renowned Cuban tobacco producers. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Raul Valdes Villasusa shows tobacco that was grown without artificial fertilizers on his tobacco farm, inside a building where leaves are dried in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. His farm forms part of a co-op of tobacco farmers who sell their crop to the government and keep a small portion for themselves. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 25, 2016 photo, Marcelo Montesino, 92, right, and his son Eulogio Montesino, 55, pose inside the building where they dry tobacco leaves on their Montesino tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Eulogio, who said his father has the "health of steel" thanks to eating farm-grown organic food his entire life, hopes to one day create a cigar brand named in his father's honor. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this March 1, 2016 photo, women select and clean tobacco leaves inside a state-run warehouse in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. After the central vein is removed from each dried leaf, they're dipped in ammonium and water and dried again for at least two months. The more years the leaves are allowed to dry, like wine, the more valuable they are considered by cigar enthusiasts, and called "reserve" cigars. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this March 1, 2016 photo, a picture of revolutionary hero Ernesto "Che" Guevara decorates a the wall inside a state-run warehouse where workers select tobacco leaves in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Tobacco operations receive tourists on group visits organized by state tourism agencies and foreigners by the hundreds receive lectures on Cuban tobacco. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, Jorge Luis Leon Becerra, 43, waits on his oxcart for workers to bring their freshly picked tobacco leaves before takinge them to a warehouse for drying at the Martinez tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Unseasonably heavy rains have damaged Cuba's tobacco crop and raised questions about iconic cigar brands that some aficionados hope will not suffer from declining quality amid higher demand. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Yoberlan Castillo Garcia walks in the cold morning air to his small tobacco farm in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Garcia, 30, said he's been running the farm with his brother-in-law for the last 10 years. As he walked to check on the land, his brother-in-law took tourists on a tour of their farm by horse. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
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