Why your grocery bill looks better these days

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It's likely you're shelling out less money to pay for groceries than you have in the past.

According to Business Insider, many of America's big supermarket chains are reducing their prices amid "ongoing food-price deflation and growing pressure" from the proliferation of discount grocery chains like German-owned discount chain Aldi.

Although slashed prices at the grocer typically offer shoppers a reason to celebrate, it's not surprising that the grocery stores themselves don't seem as thrilled. The continued price cuts continue to squeeze profits and tug down company shares.

RELATED: 10 supermarket traps you should always avoid:

10 supermarket traps
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10 supermarket traps

Large shopping carts

According to Martin Lindstrom, the larger the shopping cart, the more likely you are to spend. The marketing consultant told The Consumerist"We doubled their size as a test, and customers bought 19% more."

Pleasing aromas and colorful sights

Walking into a grocery store and smelling freshly baked goods and flowers, especially if you're in a good mood, is a surefire way to get you to throw a few unnecessary items into your cart as your begin shopping experience.

Fresh produce first​

After you've already been tricked into picking up a loaf of bread or some flowers, supermarkets also get you by placing the produce in the front of the store. By doing this, they fool you into believing you're being healthier by shopping for fruits and veggies first so you won't feel bad if you decide to stock up on a few unhealthier snacks along the way to checkout, too.

Mist on produce

You may think the mist on fresh fruits and veggies is helping the produce, but in all actuality, it makes them rot faster. Also, be sure to shake off the access water before purchasing your produce -- the mist tends to add additional weight, making the price go up.

Slow, boring music

Have you ever wondered why most grocery stores play some sort of elevator music? It's because they want you to take your time while shopping. Many stores play music slower than the average heartbeat, so pop your headphones in and play upbeat music to combat this trick.

10-for-$10 promotions

It's common to believe you're getting a great deal during a 10-for-$10 promotion, but say, if a can of beans was originally 87 cents, you're actually paying more versus buying 10 of the same cans when they aren't on "sale."

Dairy being in the back of the store

The reasoning behind the age-old trick of placing milk and other dairy products in the back of the store may surprise you. Although it forces you to walk through various aisles, the true reason is because trucks unload their shipments in the back of store, and since milk needs to be refrigerated immediately, the easiest place to keep it is in the back.

More expensive items at eye level

If you've ever wondered why all of the expensive items seem to be the most accessible, there's a reason behind that, too. Supermarkets place cheaper items on the lower and higher shelves and reserve the middle, or eyesight level, shelves for their most expensive products.

Buying premium deli products

Just because you are buying a seemingly fresh cut of meat or fish from the deli and paying a higher price, doesn't necessarily mean the product is of better quality. Often times, the meat was previously frozen meaning you may have to use it sooner than meat you would buy from the frozen section.

Changing the layout of the store... often

Don't get too comfortable with your local supermarket's layout. Markets believe that when a person remembers where there items they plan on buying are, they'll spend less time in the store and will ultimately spend less money.


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Business Insider says Whole Foods, Kroger, Sprouts Farmers Market and Dollar General have experienced a collective 13 percent dip in stock prices over the last three months.

In a price check last year, Business Insider found Aldi's prices were about 30 percent lower than Walmart's.

To help prevent stores like Aldi from wooing their customers away with low prices, Business Insider says Kroger has decreased the cost of 1,000 popular grocery items in many of its stores. Dollar General, Trader Joe's and Walmart have also worked to slash prices this year.

Aldi has 1,500 stores in the U.S. now, with plans to construct 500 more stores over the next two years.

Lidl, another German-based discount supermarket chain, also plans to open up shop in the U.S. The company told Business Insider that it has plans to open stores in "dozens of cities" in the U.S.

Where do you shop for groceries? Do you pick your store solely based on item prices? Sound off below or on our Facebook page.

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