Kim Kardashian took out a full-page ad in the New York Times to roast The Wall Street Journal

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Kim Kardashian is pissed that TheWall Street Journal published a full-page ad in April denying the Armenian genocide, so she decided to fight fire with fire. Over the weekend, Kardashian took out a full-page ad of her own in the New York Times to put the WSJ on blast.

In the Saturday ad, Kardashian wrote that she and her family are "no strangers to BS in the press." But she couldn't just brush off the WSJ's decision to publish an ad effectively denying that nearly 1.5 million Armenians were murdered over the course of a year (from 1915 to 1916) by the Ottoman government.

"For the Wall Street Journal to publish something like this is reckless, upsetting and dangerous," Kardashian wrote in the ad. "It's one thing when a crappy tabloid profits from a made-up scandal, but for a trusted publication like WSJ to profit from genocide – it's shameful and unacceptable."

Kardashian slammed the WSJ's stance that it was publishing a "provocative viewpoint," and instead accused the newspaper of spreading lies. She called for Turkey to be held accountable for the Ottoman government's actions, and urged the U.S. government to recognize the genocide.

A look back at the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide:

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Armenia genocide 100 years
People lay flowers at the Tsitsernakaberd Memorial, on April 24, 2015 in Yerevan, as part of the Armenian genocide centenary commemoration. Armenians on April 24 marked the centenary of the massacre of up to 1.5 million of their kin by Ottoman forces as France called on Turkey to recognise the 1915 slaughter as genocide. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
People lay flowers at the Tsitsernakaberd Memorial, on April 24, 2015 in Yerevan, as part of the Armenian genocide centenary commemoration. Armenians on April 24 marked the centenary of the massacre of up to 1.5 million of their kin by Ottoman forces as France called on Turkey to recognise the 1915 slaughter as genocide. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
Armanian people take part in a commemoration service at the Armenian Patriarchate in Istanbul on April 24, 2015, marking the centenary of the massacre of up to 1,5 million of Armenians by Ottoman forces. AFP PHOTO / YASIN AKGUL (Photo credit should read YASIN AKGUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Soldiers stand guard in front of the Tsitsernakaberd Memorial in Yerevan on April 24, 2015 during a commemoration ceremony for the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
A Lebanese priest of Armenian descent passes by human remains of people killed in 1915 inside an Armenian church as many in Lebanon marked the 100th anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman Turks around the time of World War I, in Antelias, north of Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, April 24, 2015. Historians estimate up to 1.5 million Armenians were killed, an event widely viewed by genocide scholars as the first genocide of the 20th century. Turkey, however, denies the deaths constituted genocide, saying the toll has been inflated and that those killed were victims of civil war and unrest. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
IGDIR, TURKEY - (ARCHIVE) : A file photo dated February 28, 1986 shows mass grave where bones and skulls of Turkish people, allegedly killed by Armenians and found during mass grave excavation in Igdir's Oba Village, Turkey. Despite Armenian's genocide claim, Turkish scientists working at Erzurum-based Ataturk University and excavate mass graves since 1986, claim that Armenians killed Turkish Muslims. As a proof they show the skulls and bones of some of those who were killed. Erol Kurkcuoglu, professor at the Erzurum-based Ataturk University's Turkey-Armenia Relations Research Center, announced that nearly 5000 bodies of Turks was found during mass grave excavation in the eastern provinces of Erzurum, Kars, Igdir and Van. (Photo by Esref Uzundere/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
IGDIR, TURKEY - (ARCHIVE) : A file photo dated February 28, 1986 shows mass grave where bones and skulls of Turkish people, allegedly killed by Armenians and found during mass grave excavation in Igdir's Oba Village, Turkey. Despite Armenian's genocide claim, Turkish scientists working at Erzurum-based Ataturk University and excavate mass graves since 1986, claim that Armenians killed Turkish Muslims. As a proof they show the skulls and bones of some of those who were killed. Erol Kurkcuoglu, professor at the Erzurum-based Ataturk University's Turkey-Armenia Relations Research Center, announced that nearly 5000 bodies of Turks was found during mass grave excavation in the eastern provinces of Erzurum, Kars, Igdir and Van. (Photo by Esref Uzundere/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Armenian people gather around a chasm in the mountain during a commemoration ceremony at a site called 'Dudan' near Diyarbakir, and believed to be a mass grave of the Armenian Genocide, on April 22, 2015. Armenians prepare to commemorate a hundred years since a genocide wiped out up to 1.5 million of their kin as a fierce dispute still rages with Turkey over one of the greatest crimes of the 20th century. AFP PHOTO / ILYAS AKENGIN (Photo credit should read ILYAS AKENGIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Armenian people gather around a chasm in the mountain during a commemoration ceremony at a site called 'Dudan' near Diyarbakir, and believed to be a mass grave of the Armenian Genocide, on April 22, 2015. Armenians prepare to commemorate a hundred years since a genocide wiped out up to 1.5 million of their kin as a fierce dispute still rages with Turkey over one of the greatest crimes of the 20th century. AFP PHOTO / ILYAS AKENGIN (Photo credit should read ILYAS AKENGIN/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 21: The Istanbul based Turkic Platform's hold a dance show at Times Square in New York, in response to the Armenian claims on 1915 incidents, on April 21, 2015 at the 100th anniversary of the 1915 incidents. (Photo by Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
People lay flowers at the Tsitsernakaberd Memorial, on April 24, 2015 in Yerevan, as part of the Armenian genocide centenary commemoration. Armenians on April 24 marked the centenary of the massacre of up to 1.5 million of their kin by Ottoman forces as France called on Turkey to recognise the 1915 slaughter as genocide. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV (Photo credit should read KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
Iranian Armenians shout slogans against Turkey on April 24, 2015 during a demonstration outside the Turkish embassy in Tehran to mark the 100th anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians under the Ottoman Empire in 1915. Armenia says an estimated 1.5 million people were killed by Ottoman forces in what it calls a genocide. AFP PHOTO / BEHROUZ MEHRI (Photo credit should read BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)
People lay flowers at the Tsitsernakaberd Memorial, on April 24, 2015 in Yerevan, as part of the Armenian genocide centenary commemoration. Armenians on April 24 marked the centenary of the massacre of up to 1.5 million of their kin by Ottoman forces as France called on Turkey to recognise the 1915 slaughter as genocide. AFP PHOTO / KAREN MINASYAN (Photo credit should read KAREN MINASYAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Thousands of Lebanese of Armenian descent, holding banners and a giant Armenian flag, march to mark the 100th anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman Turks around the time of World War I, in Antelias, north of Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, April 24, 2015. Historians estimate up to 1.5 million Armenians were killed, an event widely viewed by genocide scholars as the first genocide of the 20th century. Turkey, however, denies the deaths constituted genocide, saying the toll has been inflated and that those killed were victims of civil war and unrest. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
Thousands of Lebanese of Armenian descent, holding a banner and Armenian flags, march to mark the 100th anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman Turks around the time of World War I, in Antelias, north of Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, April 24, 2015. Historians estimate up to 1.5 million Armenians were killed, an event widely viewed by genocide scholars as the first genocide of the 20th century. Turkey, however, denies the deaths constituted genocide, saying the toll has been inflated and that those killed were victims of civil war and unrest. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
A man places a candle in front of the Brandenburg Gate to build the year 1915 during a demonstration after an ecumenical service remembering the Armenian 'slaughter' at the Berlin Cathedral Church in Berlin, Germany, Thursday, April 23, 2015. On Friday, April 24, Armenians will mark the centenary of what historians estimate to be the slaughter of up to 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks, an event widely viewed by scholars as genocide. Turkey, however, denies the deaths constituted genocide and says the death toll has been inflated. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
Armenians gather to lay flowers at a memorial to victims of massacres as they mark the centenary anniversary of the mass killings, in Yerevan, Armenia, Thursday, April 23, 2015. On Friday, April 24, Armenians will mark the centenary of what historians estimate to be the slaughter of up to 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks, an event widely viewed by scholars as genocide. Turkey, however, denies the deaths constituted genocide and says the death toll has been inflated. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
A religious service is held in Echmiadzin, the religious center of the Armenian Church outside the capital Yerevan, Armenia, Thursday, April 23, 2015. The Armenian Apostolic Church, the country's dominant religion, held services Thursday to canonize all victims. On Friday, April 24, Armenians will mark the centenary of what historians estimate to be the slaughter of up to 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks, an event widely viewed by scholars as genocide. Turkey, however, denies the deaths constituted genocide and says the death toll has been inflated. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
Armenian President Serzh Sarkisian puts a yellow rose into a wreth to be laid at the Genocide memoral during a ceremony on April 24, 2015 in Yerevan, as part of the Armenian genocide centenary comemoration. Armenians on April 24 marked the centenary of the massacre of up to 1.5 million of their kin by Ottoman forces as France called on Turkey to recognise the 1915 slaughter as genocide. AFP PHOTO / ALAIN JOCARD (Photo credit should read ALAIN JOCARD/AFP/Getty Images)
A woma holds a poster reading 'by condemning the previous we could have preventing the following' and displaying the dates 1915 and 1939 during a vigal after a church service commemorating the centenary of the massacre of 1,5 million Armenians by Ottoman forces at the Cathedral in Berlin on April 23, 2015. German President Joachim Gauck's speech at an event marked the first time that Berlin has officially used the word 'genocide' to describe the killings during World War I, and an unusually strong acknowledgement of the then German empire's role in them. AFP PHOTO / TOBIAS SCHWARZ (Photo credit should read TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images)
The remains of Armenians are seen at the Armenian Martyrs memorial at the Saint Stephano church on the eve of the 100 hundred year anniversary of the Armenians massacred by Ottoman forces a century ago, in the Armenian Orthodox Archdeocese of Antelias, north of Beirut, on April 23, 2015. Armenians around the world are marking the centenary of the World War I-era mass killings of their kin by Ottoman Turks in what they insist was a genocide -- a term fiercely rejected by Turkey. AFP PHOTO / JOSEPH EID (Photo credit should read JOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images)
VAGHARSHAPAT, ARMENIA - APRIL 23: Crowds attend a canonization ceremony for victims of the Armenian genocide at the Mother See of Holy Etchmiadzin, a complex that serves as the administrative headquarters of the Armenian Apostolic Church, on April 23, 2015 in Vagharshapat, Armenia. Tomorrow will mark the one hundredth anniversary of events generally considered to be the start of a campaign of genocide against minority ethnic Armenians living in present-day eastern Turkey by the Ottoman government over fears of their allegiance during World War I. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
People lay flowers as they gather to pay their respects during a ceremony on April 24, 2015 at the Memorial of the Armenian Genocide in Marseille, as part of the Armenian genocide centenary commemoration. Armenians on April 24 marked the centenary of the massacre of up to 1.5 million of their kin by Ottoman forces as France called on Turkey to recognise the 1915 slaughter as genocide. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)
Youths, with their mouths taped, take part in a sit-in at Beirut's Martyr's Square on April 18, 2015, organised by Lebanon's principal Armenian political party, Tashnag, ahead of the 100th anniversary of the mass killings of Armenians under the Ottoman Empire in 1915. The protestors set up tents and will take part in a hunger strike to raise awareness about the plight of the the Armenian people. AFP PHOTO / AMWAR AMRO (Photo credit should read ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
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