OnlyOnAOL: This supermodel's new campaign will melt your heart

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By: Donna Freydkin

She's way, way more than just a very pretty face.

Doutzen Kroes, a supermodel who's donned lingerie for Victoria's Secret, has embraced a whole new campaign. She's working with the The Elephant Crisis Fund to launch the #KnotOnMyPlanet campaign on September 9, 2016, during New York Fashion Week. The goal: stopping elephant poaching and stopping the trafficking and demand for their ivory. (See our interview with her fellow Victoria's Secret models Sara Sampaio and Josephine Skriver above).

"It's so necessary right now. It's a hot topic on the news. It's been an ongoing project for two years. So many people are doing everything for free. When I first started this project, I didn't know how much work I'd be putting into this," she says.

Kroes, the global ambassador, is working with Joan Smalls, Miranda Kerr, Cara Delevingne, Adriana Lima, Robin Wright, Pearl Jam, and Adrien Brody. And the timing couldn't be better. A comprehensive census of African elephants, just released, has found that the population of the pachyderms has decreased by nearly a third between 2007 and 2014.

Balmain : Runway - Paris Fashion Week - Menswear Spring/Summer 20172016 CFDA Fashion Awards - ArrivalsShe remembers her formative elephant experience. "I was with my husband and my son in Kenya. It was love at first sight. The emotional connection they have with each other – I can't imagine how people can kill such amazing animals. And for what? A luxury item," she says, referring to ivory.

Her impetus towards activism was simple: motherhood. "It helps when you have children. You think about things in a different way. I've always been an animal lover. You hear about elephants dying and at some point there won't be any wild elephants left. You want your kids to see wild elephants," she says.

Kroes reached out to her very bold-faced circle of friends for help. "I got all my model colleagues involved. Pearl Jam -- a friend of mine knew them. I knew Robin Wright. She narrated the film. It's a snowball effect," says Kroes. "We can use fashion in a good way. People are ready for that. People work for free on this. It's mind-blowing to see what we have accomplished."

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See her video here:

Below, a look at elephant conservation in Malaysia.

15 PHOTOS
NTP: Elephant conservation in Malaysia
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NTP: Elephant conservation in Malaysia
KUALA GANDAH, MALAYSIA - MARCH 01: An Elephant is seen swimming in a river near the National Elephant Conservation Centre on March 1, 2016 in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia. Almost 1,200 wild Asian Elephants, also known as Elephus Maximus, are left in Malaysia and this is the only conservation centre set up to relocate these displaced pachyderms. The elephants here have been rescued from all over Peninsula Malaysia, providing them a safe sanctuary in the wild, according to World Wildlife Foundation, the increasing human population in Asia has affected the elephant's dense, but diminishing forest habitat. (Photo by Mohd Samsul Mohd Said/Getty Images)
KUALA GANDAH, MALAYSIA - MARCH 01: Foreign tourists are seen bathing with an elephant in a river near the National Elephant Conservation Centre on March 1, 2016 in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia. Almost 1,200 wild Asian Elephants, also known as Elephus Maximus, are left in Malaysia and this is the only conservation centre set up to relocate these displaced pachyderms. The elephants here have been rescued from all over Peninsula Malaysia, providing them a safe sanctuary in the wild, according to World Wildlife Foundation, the increasing human population in Asia has affected the elephant's dense, but diminishing forest habitat. (Photo by Mohd Samsul Mohd Said/Getty Images)
KUALA GANDAH, MALAYSIA - MARCH 01: A Nature guide is seen walking with an elephant after bathing and cleaning in a river near the National Elephant Conservation Centre on March 1, 2016 in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia. Almost 1,200 wild Asian Elephants, also known as Elephus Maximus, are left in Malaysia and this is the only conservation centre set up to relocate these displaced pachyderms. The elephants here have been rescued from all over Peninsula Malaysia, providing them a safe sanctuary in the wild, according to World Wildlife Foundation, the increasing human population in Asia has affected the elephant's dense, but diminishing forest habitat. (Photo by Mohd Samsul Mohd Said/Getty Images)
KUALA GANDAH, MALAYSIA - MARCH 01: Nature guides bath elephant's in a river near the National Elephant Conservation Centre on March 1, 2016 in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia. Almost 1,200 wild Asian Elephants, also known as Elephus Maximus, are left in Malaysia and this is the only conservation centre set up to relocate these displaced pachyderms. The elephants here have been rescued from all over Peninsula Malaysia, providing them a safe sanctuary in the wild, according to World Wildlife Foundation, the increasing human population in Asia has affected the elephant's dense, but diminishing forest habitat. (Photo by Mohd Samsul Mohd Said/Getty Images)
KUALA GANDAH, MALAYSIA - MARCH 01: A Nature guide is seen with an elephant in a river near the National Elephant Conservation Centre on March 1, 2016 in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia. Almost 1,200 wild Asian Elephants, also known as Elephus Maximus, are left in Malaysia and this is the only conservation centre set up to relocate these displaced pachyderms. The elephants here have been rescued from all over Peninsula Malaysia, providing them a safe sanctuary in the wild, according to World Wildlife Foundation, the increasing human population in Asia has affected the elephant's dense, but diminishing forest habitat. (Photo by Mohd Samsul Mohd Said/Getty Images)
KUALA GANDAH, MALAYSIA - MARCH 01: A Nature guide rides an elephant in a river near the National Elephant Conservation Centre on March 1, 2016 in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia. Almost 1,200 wild Asian Elephants, also known as Elephus Maximus, are left in Malaysia and this is the only conservation centre set up to relocate these displaced pachyderms. The elephants here have been rescued from all over Peninsula Malaysia, providing them a safe sanctuary in the wild, according to World Wildlife Foundation, the increasing human population in Asia has affected the elephant's dense, but diminishing forest habitat. (Photo by Mohd Samsul Mohd Said/Getty Images)
This picture taken on November 10, 2015 shows mahouts with their elephants in a river at the Kuala Gandah Elephant Conservation Centre in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia's Pahang state. The conservation centre is a base for the Elephant Relocation Team, which began the elephant translocation programme in 1974. AFP PHOTO / MOHD RASFAN (Photo credit should read MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on November 10, 2015 shows a mahout riding an elephant along a river at the Kuala Gandah Elephant Conservation Centre in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia's Pahang state. The conservation centre is a base for the Elephant Relocation Team, which began the elephant translocation programme in 1974. AFP PHOTO / MOHD RASFAN (Photo credit should read MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on November 10, 2015 shows visitors looking on as mahouts lead their elephants from a river after washing them at the Kuala Gandah Elephant Conservation Centre in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia's Pahang state. The conservation centre is a base for the Elephant Relocation Team, which began the elephant translocation programme in 1974. AFP PHOTO / MOHD RASFAN (Photo credit should read MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on November 10, 2015 shows mahouts riding elephants along a river at the Kuala Gandah Elephant Conservation Centre in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia's Pahang state. The conservation centre is a base for the Elephant Relocation Team, which began the elephant translocation programme in 1974. AFP PHOTO / MOHD RASFAN (Photo credit should read MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A foreign visitor feeds an elephant at the Kuala Gandah Elephant Conservation Center in Kuala Gandah, Pahang, on the outside Kuala Lumpur on June 16, 2013. The conservation center is a base for the Elephant Relocation Team, which began the elephant translocation program in 1974. AFP PHOTO / MOHD RASFAN (Photo credit should read MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors play with an elephant in the river at the Kuala Gandah Elephant Conservation Center in Kuala Gandah, Pahang, on the outside Kuala Lumpur on June 16, 2013. The conservation center is a base for the Elephant Relocation Team, which began the elephant translocation program in 1974. AFP PHOTO / MOHD RASFAN (Photo credit should read MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Keepers lead the elephants out of the river after cleaning them at the Kuala Gandah Elephant Conservation Center in Kuala Gandah, Pahang, on the outside Kuala Lumpur on June 16, 2013. The conservation center is a base for the Elephant Relocation Team, which began the elephant translocation program in 1974. AFP PHOTO / MOHD RASFAN (Photo credit should read MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A Keeper rides an elephant in the river at the Kuala Gandah Elephant Conservation Center in Kuala Gandah, Pahang, on the outside Kuala Lumpur on June 16, 2013. The conservation center is a base for the Elephant Relocation Team, which began the elephant translocation program in 1974. AFP PHOTO / MOHD RASFAN (Photo credit should read MOHD RASFAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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