Pediatricians get tough on parents who are anti-vaccine

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Pediatricians Get Tough On Parents Who Are Anti-Vaccine

By Susana Victoria Perez, Veuer

As the school year kicks off, the issue of vaccinations is at the forefront once again -- and the nation's pediatricians are not being shy about urging parents to vaccinate their children.

The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement deeming it "acceptable" for pediatricians to apply the "vaccinate or leave" policy as the hesitancy to vaccinate rises nationwide.

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According to the organization, 87 percent of its members have been challenged within the last year by a parent who refused to vaccinate their children, compared to 75 percent in 2006.

The "vaccinate or leave" policy is considered a last resort, and pediatricians should educate parents about the benefits of immunization as early as the first prenatal visit to their practice.

The AAP suggests that pediatricians personalize the message as well by sharing their decision to vaccinate their own children and grandchildren.

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How the flu vaccine is made
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How the flu vaccine is made
Quality control manager Nina Kotlyarova prepares to check samples for unwanted bacteria as part of the process for making an influenza vaccine at Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. After a limited distribution last season, Protein Sciences Corporation expects to ship 1 million doses of Flublok for this coming flu season. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A bioreactor stands in the production facilities of Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on a greater variety of vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Quality control manager Nina Kotlyarova prepares to check samples for unwanted bacteria as part of the process for making an influenza vaccine at Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on additional vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Protein Sciences CEO Manon Cox speaks to a reporter in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on more vaccine options for the coming flu season. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A bioreactor, left, stands in the production facilities of Protein Sciences in Pearl River, N.Y., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015. Protein Sciences is among the companies working on addational vaccine options for the coming flu season. Flublok, their genetically engineered vaccine, is for people allergic to eggs but approved for anyone 18 or older. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
In this Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 photo, slides of human cells that have been exposed to the flu virus and dyed to bring out the cells fighting the virus are shown on a holder, at the Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health's laboratory, in Seattle. State health officials say state labs have confirmed at least 120 flu deaths since the season started in September, but only a fraction of those who die from the flu are tested for the virus. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
In this Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 photo, Paul Swenson, director of the Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health's laboratory, works under the protective glass of a biological safety cabinet as he exposes human cells to a suspected flu virus taken with a swab from the throat of a sick person, in Seattle. State health officials say state labs have confirmed at least 120 flu deaths since the season started in September, but only a fraction of those who die from the flu are tested for the virus. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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