There is an actual sleeping position that makes your period less painful

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Has your period ever kept you from falling asleep? Mine sure has. I'm an adult and still cry because of cramps, and sometimes they hurt so much I use my dachshund as a heating pad. Not to mention, I don't particularly enjoy waking in pools of my own blood, and neither does my heating pad dachshund. Your period may be gentle and easy to sleep on, but in my case, period-sleep deserves it's own season of American Horror Story. Either way, don't fret my sleep enthusiasts, there is good news for all who menstruate. It turns out there is a sleeping position that may solve all our period-sleep problems: the fetal position.

Glamour spoke with Dr Lisa Mindley, MD, who told the mag that "sleeping in the fetal position takes pressure off the abdominal muscles," as it causes the "the skeletal muscles around your abdomen" to relax. Basically, the less strain there is on your abdomen, the less pain and cramping you will experience. Jennifer Wider, M.D., concurred, telling Glamour, that "many women report that the fetal position can help relieve cramps."

Related: Period Cramp Cures Don't Exist Because Science Is Sexist

But that's not all. Sleeping in fetal position can help prevent leakage, too! According to research conducted by the period-tracking app Clue, sleeping in fetal position — with your legs pressed together — makes you less likely to leak, even on your heaviest of days.

RELATED: Odd things people do in their sleep

Oddest things people do in their sleep
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Oddest things people do in their sleep

Sleep eating

Nocturnal sleep-related eating disorder is characterized by people sleep walking to their kitchens and eating. Often times, they have no recollection of it, and only realize when they discover messes and missing food.

Sometimes, the patient has severe weight gain and other health issues attributed to the disorder. 

Frequently, the foods eaten are high in fat, sugar and carbohydrates. Furthermore, people with the disorder create bizarre food combinations with the items they have access to in their kitchen. 

Acting out their dreams

REM sleep behavior disorder physically play out their dreams, moving their bodies or even getting out of bed.

Their dreams are so vivid and real, that during REM sleep, which normally restrains your muscles, your body still flails. 


It is possible to experience auditory, visual, tactile and olfactory hallucinations, as many times, the person cannot tell what is part of a dream and what is part of reality. 

The hallucinations often happen in the stages right before sleep (hypnogogic) or after sleep (hypnopompic). Hypnogogic can be associated with sleep paralysis and a fearful sensation. 

Hypnopompic is usually associated with dreams and 'feeling a presence in the room'. 

Sleep sex

Called 'sexsomnia', it falls under the category of parasomnia, the stage right before you fall asleep.

When a person has this disorder, they oftentimes engage in sexual acts with a partner or themselves, while asleep. They have no recollection of it. 

It is more common for people who normally are affected by other sleep disorders, or those taking sleep medications.

Sleep texting

Apparently, more and more people are sending texts in their sleep. 

"It is very common for people to do things in their sleep that they do repeatedly during the day," said a neurologist in an article to BBC. 

Understandably, the texts make little sense to the person after they've woken up. 

Exploding head syndrome 

It occurs when you're about to drift off into sleep, and suddenly a loud noise goes off in your head. 

Another parasomnia event, exploding head syndrome sounds similar to a clap of thunder or bomb. However, it sounds as if the noise could be heard by everyone, but in reality, it's internal.


But what if you don't like sleeping on your side? Well, that's fine too — but if you're worried about leakage, try to avoid sleeping face-down. Lying on your stomach can put pressure on your abdomen, which causes more blood to come out, Dr. Wider told Glamour. So if you're prone to leakage or just really like your sheets, stick to sleeping on your side.

There's still no definite cure for PMS, but at least we now know a way to sleep a little bit sounder. So until PMS medicine makes itself known, you can find me in fetal position — hopefully fast-asleep this time.

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